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Resource Documents: New Mexico (3 items)

RSSNew Mexico

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  July 4, 2021
California, Economics, New Mexico, Technology, Texas, U.S.Print storyE-mail story

How Green Mandates Are Undermining the Affordability and Reliability of Electricity

Author:  Power the Future

On Earth Day, President Biden pledged under the Paris Climate Agreement that the United States would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent in ten years (below 2005 levels). This goal is as preposterous as it is impractical. It’s clear that the Biden Administration is misleading the American people to impose the Green Agenda which includes stifling bureaucratic manipulation in every sector of the economy. Power The Future’s latest study, “Lights Out: How Green Mandates Are Undermining the Affordability and Reliability of Electricity,” explores the real costs and benefits of Biden’s plan.

Biden’s Climate Envoy John Kerry has himself admitted: “Almost 90 percent of all of the planet’s global emissions come from outside of U.S. borders. We could go to zero tomorrow and the problem isn’t solved.”

On this, as in little else, Kerry is right: Even assuming every signatory to the Paris Agreement (the US included, as pledged under President Obama) fulfilled its emissions commitments, the climate impact “is minuscule.” In measuring the temperature impact of every nation fulfilling every promise by 2030, the total temperature reduction would be 0.048°C (0.086°F) by 2100. Carry those assumptions out another 70 years, and Paris would reduce temperatures by just 0.17°C by 2100.

So what can we realistically expect from the types of proposals Biden is pushing? PTF looked at the results of renewable mandates in Texas, California, and New Mexico to find out.

Based on data from those states, it is clear that Biden’s pledge under the Paris Agreement sets the country on a dangerous trajectory. Green radicals will use it to push their fever dream of a 100 percent “clean” grid, powered by sources that don’t work at night or on cloudy days. These policies destroy good-paying jobs and raise energy prices. It’s time to wake up to these realities with policies that promote fuel diversity, reliability, and affordability—before it’s too late for all of us.

Download original document: “How Green Mandates Are Undermining the Affordability and Reliability of Electricity

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Date added:  January 18, 2019
New Mexico, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

On infrasound generated by wind farms and its propagation in low-altitude tropospheric waveguides

Author:  Marcillo, Omar; et al.

[Abstract]
Infrasound from a 60‐turbine wind farm was found to propagate to distances up to 90 km under nighttime atmospheric conditions. Four infrasound sensor arrays were deployed in central New Mexico in February 2014; three of these arrays captured infrasound from a large wind farm. The arrays were in a linear configuration oriented southeast with 13, 54, 90, and 126 km radial distances and azimuths of 166°, 119°, 113°, and 111° from the 60 1.6 MW turbine Red Mesa Wind Farm, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico, USA. Peaks at a fundamental frequency slightly below 0.9 Hz and its harmonics characterize the spectrum of the detected infrasound. The generation of this signal is linked to the interaction of the blades, flow gradients, and the supporting tower. The production of wind‐farm sound, its propagation, and detection at long distances can be related to the characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer. First, under stable conditions, mostly occurring at night, winds are highly stratified, which enhances the production of thickness sound and the modulation of other higher‐frequency wind turbine sounds. Second, nocturnal atmospheric conditions can create low‐altitude waveguides (with altitudes on the order of hundreds of meters) allowing long‐distance propagation. Third, night and early morning hours are characterized by reduced background atmospheric noise that enhances signal detectability. This work describes the characteristics of the infrasound from a quasi‐continuous source with the potential for long‐range propagation that could be used to monitor the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

Omar Marcillo, Philip Blom, Earth and Environmental Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico
Stephen Arrowsmith, Kyle Jones, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmosphere, 120, 9855–9868, doi:10.1002/2014JD022821.

On infrasound generated by wind farms and its propagation in low‐altitude tropospheric waveguides

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Real-time wind production — various regions

Author:  National Wind Watch


World: Current electricity production and consumption of “low-carbon” and “renewable” electricity – click an area for details


Europe: Quarter-hour load, generation, exchange – click on sample graph for other countries


Nordpool: Current production by source type in the Nordic power system (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Denmark)

Nordpool: Current power flow in the Nordic power system


West Denmark: Electricity prices, consumption, and production today, every 5 minutes


France: Quarter-hour consumption and production

France: Current, weekly, monthly, yearly demand and production


Germany: Quarter-hour net electricity generation

Germany: Quarter-hour wind production in EnBW control area (Baden-Württemberg)


Great Britain: Last 24 hours of generation by fuel type, every 5 minutes

Great Britain: Current, weekly, monthly, yearly demand and production


Ireland: Daily quarter-hour wind generation and system demand

Ireland: Quarter-hour system demand and fuel mix


Spain: 10-minute demand and generation share


Australia: Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO, southern and eastern Australia): 5-minute and up to past year regional generation and fuel mix

Australia: AEMO grid (National Electricity Market): 5- and 30-minute aregional generation and fuel mix


Alberta: Monthly wind power forecast vs. actual comparison reports


Ontario: Latest hour of generation

Ontario: Daily hourly generation (scroll to bottom of table for wind plant)

Ontario: Hourly generation and other power data


Northwestern USA: Previous week, real-time 5-minute wind generation, Bonneville Power Administration
BPA load and wind generation


California: Daily hourly production, CAISO [click here to download complete report (PDF) from previous day.]
CAISO: yesterday's renewables production


Midwest ISO fuel mix


New England fuel mix (ISO-NE)


Barnstable, Massachusetts: hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly production and consumption of a 100-kW turbine since June 1, 2011 (100% daily generation would be 2,400 kWh)


Scituate, Massachusetts: hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly production and consumption of a 1.5-MW turbine since March 30, 2012 (100% daily generation would be 36,000 kWh)


Mark Richey Woodworking, Newburyport, Massachusetts: hourly, daily, monthly production of a 600-kW turbine since June 2009 (100% daily generation would be 14,400 kWh)


University of Delaware, Newark: current power output (kW) of 2,000-kW turbine

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