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Estimating maximum global land surface wind power extractability and associated climatic consequences  

Author:  | Environment, Technology

Abstract. The availability of wind power for renewable energy extraction is ultimately limited by how much kinetic energy is generated by natural processes within the Earth system and by fundamental limits of how much of the wind power can be extracted. Here we use these considerations to provide a maximum estimate of wind power availability over land. We use several different methods. First, we outline the processes associated with wind power generation and extraction with a simple power transfer hierarchy based on the assumption that available wind power will not geographically vary with increased extraction for an estimate of 68 TW. Second, we set up a simple momentum balance model to estimate maximum extractability which we then apply to reanalysis climate data, yielding an estimate of 21 TW. Third, we perform general circulation model simulations in which we extract different amounts of momentum from the atmospheric boundary layer to obtain a maximum estimate of how much power can be extracted, yielding 18–34TW. These three methods consistently yield maximum estimates in the range of 18–68 TW and are notably less than recent estimates that claim abundant wind power availability. Furthermore, we show with the general circulation model simulations that some climatic effects at maximum wind power extraction are similar in magnitude to those associated with a doubling of atmospheric CO₂. We conclude that in order to understand fundamental limits to renewable energy resources, as well as the impacts of their utilization, it is imperative to use a “top- down” thermodynamic Earth system perspective, rather than the more common “bottom-up” engineering approach.

L. M. Miller, F. Gans, and A. Kleidon
Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany; and International Max-Planck Research School for Earth System Modeling, Hamburg, Germany

Earth System Dynamics, 2, 1–12, 2011

Download original document: “Estimating maximum global land surface wind power extractability and associated climatic consequences

See also:  “How does the Earth system generate and maintain thermodynamic disequilibrium and what does it imply for the future of the planet?” by Axel Kleidon, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A (2012) 370, 1012–1040

This article is the work of the author(s) indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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