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Resource Documents: Meteorology (35 items)

RSSMeteorology

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial educational effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  November 10, 2019
Meteorology, SitingPrint storyE-mail story

Large eddy simulation study of the humidity variation in the shadow of a large wind farm

Author:  Haywood, John; et al.

Abstract— Numerous studies have shown that wind turbine wakes within a large wind farm bring about changes to both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the atmospheric boundary layers (ABL). Previously, we investigated the relative humidity budget within a wind farm via field measurements in the near-wake region and large eddy simulations (LES). The effect of the compounding wakes within a large wind farm on the relative humidity was also investigated by LES. In this study, we investigate how the areas . . .

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Date added:  August 27, 2019
Environment, MeteorologyPrint storyE-mail story

Toward understanding the physical link between turbines and microclimate impacts from in situ measurements in a large wind farm

Author:  Rajewski, Daniel; et al.

Abstract: Recent wind farm studies have revealed elevated nighttime surface temperatures but have not validated physical mechanisms that create the observed effects. We report measurements of concurrent differences in surface wind speed, temperature, fluxes, and turbulence upwind and downwind of two turbine lines at the windward edge of a utility‐scale wind farm. On the basis of these measurements, we offer a conceptual model based on physical mechanisms of how wind farms affect their own microclimate. Periods of documented curtailment and . . .

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Date added:  August 23, 2019
Environment, MeteorologyPrint storyE-mail story

Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

Author:  Baidya Roy, Somnath; and Traiteur, Justin

Abstract: Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we . . .

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Date added:  December 1, 2018
Australia, Environment, MeteorologyPrint storyE-mail story

Severe localised grain production losses from atypical frosts in the Marrabel Valley Catchment 2011–2014

Author:  Faint, John; and Morris, Mary

For the four cropping seasons from 2011- 2014, a majority of farmers in the Marrabel Valley have experienced unprecedented and widespread frost damage of grain crops on sloping paddocks high above the valley floor. Historically these areas have not been affected by frost as the steep slope of the valley sides ensures that cold air flows towards the lower lying areas where it is normal for frost to form. The onset of these seasons of atypical and the abnormal frosts . . .

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