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Documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are provided to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate.


Date added:  July 20, 2015
Health, Noise, PortugalPrint storyE-mail story

Low Frequency Noise-Induced Pathology: Contributions Provided by the Portuguese Wind Turbine Case

Author:  Castelo Branco, Nuno; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; et al.

Summary:
In November 2006, 4 Industrial Wind Turbines (IWT) were installed in the vicinity of a residential dwelling in Portugal. In March 2007, this team was contacted by the family requesting assistance in dealing with their Infrasound & Low Frequency Noise (ILFN) problem that they claimed was being generated by the IWT. The family began legal proceedings for the removal of the IWT, and in September 2007, this team’s first report was presented at the 2nd International Meeting on Wind Turbine Noise. In June 2010, a follow-up report of this case was presented at the 14th International Meeting on Low Frequency Noise and Vibration and its Control, wherein ILFN-induced pathology was confirmed through histology in this family’s thoroughbred horses. The goal of this report is to provide second follow-up to this case, five years later.

Nuno A. A. Castelo Branco, M.D., Senior Surgical Pathologist
Mariana Alves-Pereira, Ph.D., Biomedical Engineer, Lusófona University
Augusto Martinho Pimenta, M.D., Senior Neurologist, Julio de Matos Hospital
José Reis Ferreira, M.D., Senior Pneumologist, Clínica Doentes Pulmonares
Lisbon, Portugal

Presented at EuroNoise 2015, 31 May–3 June, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Download original document: “Low Frequency Noise-Induced Pathology: Contributions Provided by the Portuguese Wind Turbine Case”

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Date added:  July 20, 2015
Health, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Clinical Protocol for Evaluating Pathology Induced by Low Frequency Noise Exposure

Author:  Castelo Branco, Nuno; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; et al.

Summary:
Segments of the general population who complain about infrasound & low frequency noise (ILFN) in their homes or in their workplaces continue to increase. These individuals often complain about similar sets of concurrent symptoms, and frequently attribute their ailments directly to ILFN exposure. Oftentimes, however, routine clinical evaluations of these individuals reveal no apparent dysfunction, and patients with persistent complaints are subsequently referred to psychology or psychiatry health professionals. The goal herein is to present an objective clinical protocol that scientifically evaluates these complaints, leading to the elimination of malingerers, and to the proper medical assistance of those developing ILFN-induced lesions.

Nuno A. A. Castelo Branco, M.D., Senior Surgical Pathologist
Mariana Alves-Pereira, Ph.D., Biomedical Engineer, Lusófona University
Augusto Martinho Pimenta, M.D., Senior Neurologist, Julio de Matos Hospital
José Reis Ferreira, M.D., Senior Pneumologist, Clínica Doentes Pulmonares
Lisbon, Portugal

Presented at EuroNoise 2015, 31 May–3 June, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Download original document: “Clinical Protocol for Evaluating Pathology Induced by Low Frequency Noise Exposure”

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Date added:  July 6, 2015
Australia, Noise, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Stationary wind turbine infrasound emissions and propagation loss measurements

Author:  Huson, Les

Summary.

Microbarometers have been used to quantify the infrasonic emissions (0.05Hz to 20Hz) from five wind farms in Victoria, Australia. The wind farms measured include; Macarthur wind farm (140 turbines type Vestas V112 3MW); Cape Bridgewater (29 turbines type MM82 2MW); Leonards Hill (2 turbines type MM82 2MW); Mount Mercer (64 turbines type MM92 2MW), and; Waubra (128 turbines 3 types of Acciona Windpower 2MW).

Upwind indoor measurements at the Macarthur wind farm during an unplanned shutdown from full power and subsequent startup to 30% load has shown that stationary turbines subject to high winds emit infrasound pressure below 8 Hz at levels similar to the infrasound emissions at blade pass frequencies and harmonics.

The stationary V112 turbine infrasound emissions are caused primarily by blade and tower resonances excited by the wind. It is apparent from the mismatch of resonances and blade pass frequency components that Vestas have carefully designed this unit to minimise fatigue of the wind turbine.

Short range (up to 2km) measurements from the Leonards Hill wind farm have shown the determination of attenuation rate with distance to be problematic due to interference between the two turbines. A model to explain the unexpected attenuation results at Leonards Hill has demonstrated that the commonly observed amplitude modulation of blade pass tones is the result of changing phase between turbine rotor speed and changes in wind speed.

Long range measurements from two different wind farms over a distance of 80km have shown that infrasound below 6Hz has a propagation loss approximating 3dB per doubling of distance.

Les Huson, L Huson & Associates, Woodend, Victoria, Australia
6th International Conference on Wind Turbine Noise, Glasgow, 20-23 April 2015

Download original document: “Stationary wind turbine infrasound emissions and propagation loss measurements”

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Date added:  June 19, 2015
Aesthetics, U.S.Print storyE-mail story

Wind Turbine Visibility and Visual Impact Threshold Distances in Western Landscapes

Author:  Sullivan, Robert; et al.

Abstract

The siting of wind facilities to minimize visual impacts to high-value scenic resources presents a
major challenge for land management agencies in the western United States. The visibility and
potential visual contrasts associated with utility-scale wind facilities are dependent on complex
interactions of a variety of factors, but little systematic study of visibility in real landscape
settings has been conducted.

In a study sponsored by the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land
Management, 377 observations of five wind facilities in Wyoming and Colorado were made
under various lighting and weather conditions. The facilities were found to be visible to the
unaided eye at >58 km (36 mi) under optimal viewing conditions, with turbine blade movement
often visible at 39 km (24 mi).

Under favorable viewing conditions, the wind facilities were judged to be major foci of visual
attention at up to 19 km (12 mi) and likely to be noticed by casual observers at >37 km (23 mi).
A conservative interpretation suggests that for such facilities, an appropriate radius for visual
impact analyses would be 48 km (30 mi), that the facilities would be unlikely to be missed by
casual observers at up to 32 km (20 mi), and that the facilities could be major sources of visual
contrast at up to 16 km (10 mi).

Robert G. Sullivan
Program Manager/Coordinator, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

Leslie B. Kirchler
Landscape Specialist, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Tom Lahti
State Landscape Architect (retired), Wyoming State Office, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management

Sherry Roché
NLCS Wilderness Program Lead and Visual Resource Program Lead, Wyoming State Office, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management

Kevin Beckman
Programmer Analyst, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Brian Cantwell
Senior GIS Programmer/Analyst, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Pamela Richmond
Programmer/Analyst, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Download original document: “Wind Turbine Visibility and Visual Impact Threshold Distances in Western Landscapes”

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