[ exact phrase in "" • ~10 sec • results by date ]


[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]

LOCATION/TYPE

View headlines only
Archive
RSS

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links

Alerts

Press Releases

FAQs

Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics

Videos

Allied Groups

Wind Power News: Wyoming

RSSWyoming

These news and opinion items are gathered by National Wind Watch to help keep readers informed about developments related to industrial wind energy. They are the products of the organizations or individuals noted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of National Wind Watch.


November 15, 2017 • Opinions, WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Cheney’s silent spring

Cheney's amendment attacks the very foundations of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. If adopted, it would expose millions of birds to heightened risk of death from waste pits, electrical transmission lines, contaminated water, wind turbines and a myriad of other threats that are “incidental to the presence or operation” of industrial facilities on federal lands in Wyoming and elsewhere. It is not too much to expect industry to take precautions to avoid killing our songbirds, waterfowl, raptors and other migratory birds. If those precautions require corporations to stop and think about the broader effects of their activities, if they require an additional outlay to head off significant impacts to the rest of us, then those things are a part of doing business.

Complete story »


November 13, 2017 • U.S., WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Environmental groups push back on Cheney amendment allowing birds to be killed; industry supportive

Rep. Liz Cheney doesn’t want industry prohibited from doing business for fear of killing birds and being penalized for it. The congresswoman introduced an amendment to that effect in the SECURE Act, a sweeping piece of legislation that would, among other things, allow for more state control of oil and gas activities on federal land. It passed in the House Committee on Natural Resources on Wednesday. The amendment, however, will have a different home, tucked into the Migratory Bird Treaty . . .

Complete story »


November 13, 2017 • WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Wind subsidies survive senate, while some Wyoming lawmakers plan to increase wind tax

The wind industry breathed a sigh of relief Thursday night when the U.S. Senate’s proposed overhaul of the tax system avoided cutting into a subsidy relished by wind developers and utilities. But at the same time, a handful of lawmakers in Wyoming are showing a renewed interest in increasing taxes on wind. The state and federal measures are central to developments ongoing in Wyoming, where a handful of proposed farms could double the wind capacity in the Cowboy State. Federal . . .

Complete story »


November 8, 2017 • Idaho, WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

New path eyed for high-voltage transmission lines in Idaho

Federal officials have released their latest analysis on proposed routes for two high-voltage transmission lines in southwestern Idaho intended to modernize the Pacific Northwest’s energy grid. The 183-page draft environmental assessment released by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management late last week covers two segments of the Gateway West project proposed by Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power. The 1,000-mile Gateway West project is one side of a giant triangle of transmission lines that Rocky Mountain Power says are necessary . . .

Complete story »


November 7, 2017 • Oregon, WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

How tax reform could torpedo Pacificorp’s big wind power plan

Tax reform, the big issue on Capitol Hill these days, could spell trouble for PacifiCorp’s bid to spend billions on wind power in the next three years. The Portland-based utility’s “Energy Vision 2020” proposal calls for 999 megawatts of retooled wind turbines in several states including Oregon, 1,270 megawatts of new wind in Wyoming, and a 140-mile transmission line also in Wyoming, all at cost of around $3.2 billion. The proposal is built around an expiring federal incentive called the . . .

Complete story »


November 1, 2017 • California, WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Trump admin might finance massive wind project

Whether North America’s largest wind power project gets off the ground may rest with President Trump, a man who has railed against wind turbines for killing birds and whose top energy priority is boosting the coal industry. At issue is whether Trump will tell a federal utility to avoid becoming financially involved in a 700-mile transmission line carrying power from a proposed wind farm in Wyoming with 1,000 turbines to Southern California. The public utility, the Western Area Power Administration, . . .

Complete story »


October 30, 2017 • Colorado, Nevada, Utah, WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Energy Blend: Status of controversial 725-mile super highway for wind power unknown for Moffat County landowners

Since receiving federal approval in December, the TransWest Express Transmission Project still has several hurdles to clear before construction on the 725-mile line can begin. Amid tough economic times for Moffat County, the project promises a short-term boom of construction jobs and much-needed property tax revenues – to the tune of between $600,000 to $900,000, annually – once the line is up and running, according to a fact sheet from TransWest. But when, exactly, that will occur depends upon how quickly TransWest . . .

Complete story »


October 9, 2017 • WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Why wind? Why now? Experts say Wyoming needs to face challenges and opportunities of new wind development

Sen. Cale Case doesn’t dislike wind power, but he believes that putting up wind turbines reduces the beauty of Wyoming’s wide open panorama, its steppes and its sagebrush-coated hills. And the Republican senator from Lander believes wind should be taxed for taking away that view. View sheds were just one of a host of issues raised at a recent two-day wind forum in Laramie. It was a who’s who of Wyoming’s wind interests, gathering everyone from wind CEOs to county . . .

Complete story »


October 4, 2017 • WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Why are environmentalists comfortable with wind impacts on wildlife? Climate change

LARAMIE – Environmentalists in Wyoming are known for pushing back on industry’s impacts to the health of Wyoming’s wild ecosystems. From sage grouse protections to the reclamation that follows coal mining, there is a robust environmental community in the state that attends various regulatory meetings. But many of these folks are also, in many cases, friendly to wind development, an industry that has been criticized for its effect on eagles, raptors and other avian species that are killed by the blades . . .

Complete story »


October 4, 2017 • WyomingPrint storyE-mail story

Wind conference highlights Wyoming’s fiscal troubles, and how hard it is to fix them

LARAMIE – Wyoming has a reputation for not liking wind, and that’s a problem if it’s trying to diversify its economy via wind farms or wind industry manufacturers. That’s according to Riata Little, vice president of economic and project development for the Casper Area Economic Development Alliance. Little spoke at a two-day conference about wind energy in Wyoming that covered its potential benefits to local communities, the challenges wind developers face and the common controversies wind energy stokes in the Cowboy . . .

Complete story »


Earlier Page »

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook

Share

CONTACT DONATE PRIVACY ABOUT SEARCH
© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.
Share

Wind Watch on Facebook

Follow Wind Watch on Twitter