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Governor calls for more renewable energy development, including hydropower, offshore wind  

Credit:  By Ryan Finnerty | Hawaii Public Radio | www.hawaiipublicradio.org ~~

Hawaii’s chief executive says, under current industry estimates, there is not enough land to cover the state’s energy needs solely using photovoltaic solar. But he sees promise in other options for the state to reach 100 percent renewable energy.

In an interview with HPR this week, the second-term governor said there has been an acceleration of renewable energy projects coming online, and consumers are seeing savings.

Ige has made pursuit of the state’s renewable energy goal one of his signature issues. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative requires 100 percent of the state’s electricity come from renewable sources by 2045.

The governor said he thinks there is broad public support for the idea, noted achieving the goal means the development of more land for wind and solar projects.

Ige also said meeting that goal will likely mean exploring the development of less popular options like wave power and offshore wind.

“There is not adequate land available to be all PV-based, that we would need to have wind energy,” Ige said, recounting what was told to him by representatives of utility companies.

Recent protests of a wind power project in Kahuku on Oahu have highlighted some communities’ preference for solar over large turbines.

The governor said he also supports use of hydro-electric generation, which he called a proven technology.

With three years left in office, Ige said he wants to push beyond clean power and move toward decarbonizing the broader state economy.

Source:  By Ryan Finnerty | Hawaii Public Radio | www.hawaiipublicradio.org

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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