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Johnston mayor: Wind turbines are none of Cranston’s business  

Credit:  By Sarah Doiron, Kim Kalunian | WPRI | Dec 18, 2018 | www.wpri.com ~~

The fight continues in two local communities over seven wind turbines that now tower over their homes.

The seven turbines stand tall on privately owned industrial lots located near the Johnston Landfill, but they’re visible from Alpine Estates in Cranston. On Monday night, several residents from the neighborhood attended the Cranston city council meeting to air their grievances about the new wind farm.

When asked about the concerns Tuesday, Johnston Mayor Joseph Polisena said the town and company that owns the turbines went through the proper channels to have them constructed. Cranston residents said they were never notified of planning and zoning board hearings held in 2017.

“They don’t have to be notified,” Polisena argued. “Quite frankly, not to be rude, it’s none of their business, they don’t live in the town of Johnston. Same thing in Cranston if they were putting something on Plainfield Pike on the Cranston side they don’t have to notify the Johnston people.”

Polisena said only those within a 200-foot radius of the turbine properties had to be notified. But residents in Cranston said the turbines are eyesores and could have negative impacts on property values and their health.

A spokesman for the Rhode Island Dept. of Health said there were no identified health concerns associated with wind turbines.

“I’ve been a registered nurse for 32 years, I’ve never heard that wind turbines cause health problems,” he said. “If you don’t like them then try another argument.”

While some residents want to the turbines to be removed, Polisena said if they decide to take legal action, he’s not concerned.

Source:  By Sarah Doiron, Kim Kalunian | WPRI | Dec 18, 2018 | www.wpri.com

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments to query/wind-watch.org.

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