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Maintenance concern flagged over newer windfarms 

Credit:  Written by David McPhee | Aberdeen Journals Limited | 26/09/2018 | www.energyvoice.com ~~

Newer windfarms require more than double the amount of maintenance than older ones, according to an independent inspection firm.

Windfarms under five years of age require on average seven repairs per turbine in contrast to those older than that period only needing 2.2 repairs.

A report by UK blade repair firm Altitec claims that new projects are likely to “require more active monitoring and maintenance”, despite operators expecting to prioritise older developments.

Altitc say that the emergence of larger capacity turbine models has led to an increase in blade spans resulting in unforseen operation and maintenance (O&M) challenges.

Tom Dyffort, managing director, Altitec Group, said: “We recommend that all wind farms undergo regular blade inspections, no matter their age, to ensure they continue to perform at their optimal levels and that energy production remains as high as possible. But our records indicate that, during the first five years of a wind farm’s operational lifetime, O&M managers may be more prone to overlooking the need for blade maintenance.

“Ultimately, this will only result in more serious faults developing, more repairs being required and longer periods of turbine downtime.”

The turbine repair firm say that external repairs account for the vast majority of work required on wind turbines, adding that structures become”damaged and distorted due to the mechanical stresses placed upon them as the blades flex and twist under loading”.

Source:  Written by David McPhee | Aberdeen Journals Limited | 26/09/2018 | www.energyvoice.com

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial educational effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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