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East Bay wildlife manager to discuss wind power, birds  

Credit:  Times-Herald staff report, www.timesheraldonline.com 10 March 2012 ~~

East Bay Regional Parks District wildlife program manager Doug Bell will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 13, on wind power and its impact on birds.

While wind power has been identified as one source of energy to combat global warming, it has a serious downside for birds, according to Napa Solano Audubon Society, sponsors of the event.

In the case of the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, numerous birds, including Golden Eagles, Burrowing owls, American Kestrels, Red-Tailed Hawks and others die after getting caught in windmill blades.

Wind power facilities have also been thought to destroy wildlife habitat.

Bell’s talk will focus on reducing these impacts with proper siting, operation and mitigation, plus replacement of smaller turbines with fewer and larger facilities.

The event is free and takes place at the Florence Douglas Senior Center, 333 Amador St., Vallejo.

For more details, visit www.napasolanoaudubon.com.

Source:  Times-Herald staff report, www.timesheraldonline.com 10 March 2012

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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