[ exact phrase in "" • ~10 sec • results by date ]

[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]

LOCATION/TYPE

News Home
Archive
RSS

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links

Alerts

Press Releases

FAQs

Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics

Videos

Allied Groups

Towers alone take months to construct  

Greg Adams, a technical consultant who develops wind farms as an associate for Chermac Energy Corp., said towers are built using cranes. Smaller yard cranes are used on the job site until the base part of a tower’s pole is erected, then larger cranes are brought in to handle the rest of each tower installation.

Adams said it takes about 10 to 14 working days, spread across a three-month period, to build a tower because workers have to allow tower foundations to cure and have to install other, underground plants and all the needed wiring.

A substation also must be built to collect the turbines’ power.

Also, weather delays – often, high winds – are not uncommon. Adams said it takes a minimum of 10 months to build a farm with 50 turbines that can generate 100 megawatts of power, but said actual construction time often runs about a year for that size of development. A typical development creates about 100 construction jobs, he said.

Once wind farms are operational, they typically employ about one person for every 10 megawatts of power they generate, Adams said.

By Jack Money
Business Writer

NewsOK.com

20 July 2008

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

Wind Watch relies entirely
on User Funding
Donate $5 PayPal Donate

Share:


News Watch Home

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook

Share

CONTACT DONATE PRIVACY ABOUT SEARCH
© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.
Share

Wind Watch on Facebook

Follow Wind Watch on Twitter