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What’s in a Large Wind Ordinance? And How Does a Town Create One?  

Author:  | General, Health, Ordinances, Regulations, Safety, Wisconsin

A Look at the History, Research, and Content of the Town of Union’s Large Wind Ordinance, Step by Step, A to Z Guide

Also see the Union, Wisc., Large Wind Turbine Citizens Committee Setback Recommendations Report.

Union Label

How does an ordinance protect a township? The latest from the wind developer’s lawsuits against the Towns of Ridgeville and Wilton.

A is for Assume: What they say about the word “assume” and what that has to do with industrial turbine noise and the state of Wisconsin’s 1,000-foot setback

B is for Basics: Setbacks: How far should a 400-foot- tall industrial wind turbine be built from your door? And:  Industrial wind turbine setback issues in the news

C is for Construction: Impacts to town roads. And:  Turbine road–related problems in the news.

D is for Dear State Senator: With a response from Senator Erpenbach. And:  “NIMBY”s in the news and pictures of what less than a 2640 foot setback looks like.

E is for Explain

F is for Flicker

G is for Ground Current: What is stray voltage and why is it a problem?

H is for Help! What did the EMS helicopter pilot say about rescues near wind turbines?

I is for Ice Throw (plus update)

J is for Jurisdiction: A step-by-step look at how a Wisconsin township came to create one of the best large wind ordinances in the state. Click here for a PDF of the text (no graphics).

K is for Kamperman and James: A look at some of the documents about turbine noise which were used in creating the Town of Union Large Wind Ordinance

L is for Letters to Lepinski: What life is like in a wind farm with a 1,000-foot setback

M is for Members of the Committee & Mills Farm Life

N is for NOISE: What it’s like to live inside of an industrial wind farm

P is for Pressure, Permits, Powerlines, and the PSC

R is for Research, References and Readability: Parts One (recitals), Two (findings: general, noise, setbacks), and Three (wind turbine noise)

S is for Sound: What is the difference between Sound and Noise and why does it matter?

S is also for Safety: Doctors speak out about industrial wind turbines and health concerns

S is for Setbacks: Why 1,000 feet from your door is just too close

T is for Turbine: The anatomy of a 400 foot tall industrial machine – below ground level

T is for Turbine: What goes up sometimes crashes to the ground

T is for Turbine: The visual anatomy of a 400 foot industrial machine from the ground up

U is for Unsafe: How the State of Wisconsin failed to protect the people of Byron Township

V is for Vibroacoustic Disease (VAD): What is it, what does it have to do with the siting of industrial-scale wind turbines, and why isn’t the state of Wisconsin paying attention?

W is for Wildlife: What we now know about bats and industrial wind turbines, and a candid look at how post-construction bat and bird mortality studies are being conducted in the Forward Energy wind farm

X is for FiX What’s Broken: Why these Johnsburg and Malone wind farm residents are asking for help

Y is for a Year and a Day: 366 days in a PSC-approved industrial wind farm

Z is for Zero Regard for Residents’ Concerns: the wind farm strong-arm in New Ulm

This article is the work of the author(s) indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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