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Resource Documents: Ontario (85 items)

RSSOntario

Documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are provided to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate.


Date added:  October 20, 2016
Canada, Noise, Ontario, RegulationsPrint storyE-mail story

Considerations regarding an acoustic criterion for wind turbine acceptability

Author:  Palmer, William

Introduction. A common regulatory acceptance criterion for wind turbine installation in Canada is that sound pressure level does not exceed 40 dBA outside a home when the wind speed at 10 metres elevation does not exceed 4 metres per second. A clue to the ineffectiveness of this criterion can be seen from over 2700 complaints filed in Ontario with regulators by residents living in homes where acoustic conditions were predicted in approved models to comply with the current criterion. Residents noted the intrusiveness of an imposed sound higher in amplitude and different in quality than the pre-existing background. Residents reported disrupted sleep, and adverse health consequences. Fundamental premises of Environmental Protection Acts (EPA) are that emissions of a contaminant such as noise should not cause an adverse effect including loss of enjoyment of normal use of property, or annoyance that lead to human health impacts. …

Discussion. The subject of amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise emissions (otherwise described as a cyclical noise rising and falling in magnitude) has been a principal focus of wind turbine noise international conferences in Glasgow (2015) and Denver (2013). Monitoring of the sound inside homes displays a different character than outside, showing pulses with peak to trough amplitudes exceeding 5 dB at frequencies that are within the audible range. A simple example shows that dBA weighting does not adequately reflect perception and annoyance. White noise at 40dBA has a very different perception than pink noise at 40 dBA.

William K.G. Palmer, TRI-LEA-EM, Paisley, Ontario

Canadian Acoustics – Acoustique canadienne Vol. 44 No. 3 (2016) – pp. 42-43

Download original document: “Considerations regarding an acoustic criterion for wind turbine acceptability

Also see presentation (click here) with example sound files.

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Date added:  September 1, 2016
Health, Noise, OntarioPrint storyE-mail story

Before–after field study of effects of wind turbine noise on polysomnographic sleep parameters

Author:  Jalali, Leila; Bigelow, Philip; et al.

Introduction:

‘Sleep, a natural behavioral state and a vital part of every individual’s life, involves distinct characteristics and many vital physiological changes in the body’s organs that are fundamental for physical and mental health. The physiological processes involve protein biosynthesis, excretion of specific hormones, and memory consolidation, all of which prepare the individual for the next wake period. Fragmented and insufficient sleep can adversely affect general health impacting daytime alertness and performance, quality of life, and health, and potentially lead to serious long-term health effects.

‘Sleep disturbance is considered the most serious nonauditory effect of environmental noise exposure. Harnessing wind energy has resulted in a new source of environmental noise, and wind is one of the fastest growing forms of electricity production worldwide. Canada’s current installed capacity is over 10,000 MW, with an anticipated minimum of 55,000 MW by 2025. This growth in wind energy development is not without controversy, as health effects such as noise annoyance and sleep disturbance have been reported by residents living close to wind developments. Such reports are increasing in Canada and worldwide, despite the adoption of setbacks and other measures that have been effective for other sources of noise pollution. …’

Significant findings reported:

‘[R]eported quality of sleep significantly declined after exposure (P = 0.008). Participants also reported higher levels of stress before bedtime (P = 0.039) and in the morning (P = 0.064), and also reported feeling more sleepy (P = 0.013) in the morning and throughout the day (P = 0.014) after exposure. …

‘Noise difference [between preoperation and operation of turbines] correlated with the difference in the number of awakenings (r = 0.605, P = 0.001), SSC [sleep stage changes to a lighter stage] difference (r = 0.600, P = 0.001), arousal difference (r = 0.551, P = 0.004), and percentage of S2 [stage 2 sleep] difference (r = −0.499, P = 0.009).’

Leila Jalali, Philip Bigelow, Mahmood Gohari, Diane Williams, and Steve McColl, School of Public Health and Health Systems, and Mohammad-Reza Nezhad-Ahmadi, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Noise & Health 2016;18:194-205

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Date added:  June 6, 2016
Law, OntarioPrint storyE-mail story

Revocation of Renewable Energy Approval for Ostrander Point Wind Park

Author:  Environmental Review Tribunal, Ontario

Decision delivered by Heather I. Gibbs and Robert V. Wright —

The Director, Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (the “Director”) issued a renewable energy approval (the “REA”) on December 20, 2012, to Ostrander Point GP Inc. as general partner for and on behalf of Ostrander Point Wind Energy LP (“Ostrander”) to install nine wind turbine generators, with a total installed nameplate capacity of 22.5 megawatts, and supporting facilities (the “Project”) on the Ostrander Point Crown Land Block (the “Site”).

The Ostrander Point Crown Land Block is 324 hectares of provincial Crown land located about 15 kilometres (“km”) south of Picton on the south shore of Prince Edward County, and is one of the least developed areas of the County. It is bordered by three roads and Lake Ontario to the south. It contains a provincially significant wetland in the southeast corner and is known for its alvar vegetation. It is used for recreational purposes such as camping, hiking, “birding”, and all-terrain vehicles.

The Project would require the construction of approximately 5.4 km of gravel access roads on the Site that would be approximately 6 metres (“m”) wide with larger turnarounds. The access roads would be used to construct the wind turbines, for their ongoing maintenance, and are to be removed after decommissioning. …

Having weighed all of the relevant considerations, the Tribunal finds that the remedies proposed by Ostrander and the Director are not appropriate in the unique circumstances of this case. The Tribunal finds that the appropriate remedy under s. 145.2.1(4) is to revoke the Director’s decision to issue the REA.

Download original document: “Revocation of Renewable Energy Approval for Ostrander Point Wind Park

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Date added:  January 13, 2016
Economics, OntarioPrint storyE-mail story

Analysis of the Economic Impacts of the wpd Fairview Wind Project on the Collingwood Regional Airport and the Regional Economy

Author:  Malone Given Parsons; Cormier, Charles; Metro Economics; and Aerocan Aviation

In short, we conclude that the Collingwood Regional Airport is fulfilling its intended function as an economic engine and is attracting business expansion proposals that would deliver very substantial economic benefit to the South Georgian Bay region. Approval of the current wpd Turbine Project would be fatal to business expansion, such that, on balance, the offending turbines should be moved or wpd’s Renewable Energy Act Application denied.

January 8, 2016

Prepared By:  MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.

In Association With:
Charles Cormier, Aeronautical Information Consultant
metro economics
Aerocan Aviation Ltd.

Prepared For:
The Township of Clearview
The Town of Collingwood

Download original document: “Analysis of the Economic Impacts of the wpd Fairview Wind Project on the Collingwood Regional Airport and the Regional Economy

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