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Resource Documents by U.S. Energy Information Administration

U.S. Energy Information Administration
Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2013
“The changing mix of direct expenditures between FY 2010 and FY 2013 was primarily driven by ARRA’s Section 1603 grant program. Between FY 2010 and FY 2013, the renewable share of direct expenditures increased from 37% to 65%, while the end-use technologies share dropped from 41% to 27%.” From 2010 (see previous report) to 2013, the subsidies for wind increased from 5.453 billion dollars, 4.105 billion of that ARRA related (ie, up-front grants instead of 10-year tax credits), to 5.936 . . . Complete article »

U.S. Energy Information Administration
U.S. wind capacity factors – 2011
Source:  Form EIA-923, all wind energy facilities that submitted annual reports for ALL of 2011. Note that these are idealized figures, representing self-reports of only working turbines (i.e., not accounting for downtime for maintenance, repair, or accident). Nevertheless, according to the WIA’s annual data reports and averaging the installed capacities at the ends of 2010 and 2011, the overall capacity factor in the U.S. in 2011 was 32.1% rather than 32.0% as reported here. The difference likely varies by state. . . . Complete article »

U.S. Energy Information Administration
U.S. wind capacity factors – 2012 (preliminary)
Source:  Form EIA-923, all wind energy facilities that submitted monthly reports for ALL of 2012. Note that these are idealized figures, representing self-reports of only working turbines (i.e., not accounting for downtime for maintenance, repair, or accident). For example, according to the WIA’s annual data reports and averaging the installed capacities at the ends of 2011 and 2012, the overall capacity factor in the U.S. in 2012 was 30.4% rather than 31.8% as reported here. The difference likely varies by . . . Complete article »

U.S. Energy Information Administration
Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2010
On pages xiii and xiv in the Executive Summary of this report, federal subsidies and support for energy (mostly electricity) are compared between the years 2007 (previous report) and 2010. From 2007 to 2010, total subsidies for wind increased from $476 million to $4,986 million (both in 2010 dollars). Coal subsidies increased from $943 million to $1,358 million, although “clean coal” decreased from $3,038 million to 0. Natural gas and oil increased from $2,010 million to $2,820 million, and nuclear . . . Complete article »

U.S. Energy Information Administration
U.S. wind energy production, 2008
Form EIA-923, Electric Power Generation and Fuel Consumption, Monthly Time Series File – Preliminary Data File for 2008 (revised as of March 2009). This form reports monthly electricity production from January to December 2008 of 203 wind energy facilities in the U.S. The total production was 52,025,898 megawatt-hours, an output of 28.21% of the average installed capacity in 2008, according to the American Wind Energy Association, of 20,994 megawatts. Wind energy production made up 1.27% of the total electricity production in . . . Complete article »

U.S. Energy Information Administration
Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy Markets 2007
Table 35 on page 106 of this report shows that wind energy received $23.37 per megawatt-hour of its electricity production in 2007. This compared with 44 cents for coal, $1.59 for nuclear, and 25 cents for natural gas (the three main sources of electricity in the U.S.). Note: This is the most comprehensive study that the EIA has done, but it’s still far from complete. For wind, for example, they completely missed the federal 5-year double-declining-balance accelerated depreciation (5-yr, 200% . . . Complete article »

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