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3 papers: wind turbine noise and human health  

Author:  | Health, Noise, Ontario

Papers presented at Inter-Noise 2012, August 19-22, 2012, New York, N.Y.

Annoyance can represent a serious degradation of health: wind turbine noise a case study

Carmen ME Krogh, Roy D Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner
[download PDF]

Annoyance is often discounted as a health concern. Wind turbine noise is perceived to be more annoying than other equally loud sources of sound. The Ontario government commissioned a report which concludes a non-trivial percentage those exposed to wind turbine sound will be highly annoyed which can be expected to contribute to stress related health impacts. Our research in Ontario, Canada, documents some individuals living in the environs of wind turbines report experiencing physiological and psychological symptoms, reduced quality of life, degraded living conditions, and adverse social and economic impacts. Some families have abandoned their homes or negotiated financial agreements with wind energy developers. An Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal considered a wide body of evidence including expert testimony and found wind turbines can harm humans if placed too close to residents. Evidence including peer reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents and expert testimony are presented which support the conclusion that annoyance can represent a serious degradation of health.

Wind turbine noise perception, pathways and effects: a case study

Carmen ME Krogh, Roy D Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner
[download PDF]

In Ontario Canada wind turbines are being sited close to humans. Wind turbine noise is perceived to be more annoying than other equally loud sources of sound. This annoyance can contribute to stress related health impacts. An Ontario government commissioned report concludes a nontrivial percentage of exposed persons will be impacted. Our research documents some Ontarians living in the environs of wind turbines report experiencing physiological and psychological symptoms, reduced quality of life, degraded living conditions, and adverse social economic impacts including a loss of social justice. In some cases the effects resulted in families abandoning their homes. Others have negotiated financial agreements with wind energy developers. An Ontario Environmental Tribunal considered a wide body of evidence including expert witness testimony and found that wind turbines can harm humans if placed too close to residents. Peer reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents and expert testimony will be presented which support the conclusion that noise perception via the indirect pathway can result in serious negative effects.

Wind turbines can harm humans: a case study

Carmen ME Krogh, Roy D Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner
[download PDF]

In Canada the Ontario Government has adopted wind energy as a renewable energy source. Our research in Ontario documents some individuals living in the environs of wind turbines report experiencing physiological and psychological symptoms, reduced quality of life, degraded living conditions, and adverse social economic impacts. Some families have abandoned their homes or negotiated financial agreements with wind energy developers. Wind turbine noise is a reported cause of these effects; however, some commentators suggest sound from wind turbines does not pose a risk of any adverse health effect in humans. These competing claims can confuse authorities responsible for establishing noise guidelines. An Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal considered a wide body of evidence including expert testimony and found wind turbines can harm humans if placed too close to residents. Risks must be understood to ensure guidelines protect human health. Evidence including peer reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents and expert testimony will be presented which support the conclusion that wind turbines, if placed too close to residents, can harm human health.

This article is the work of the author(s) indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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