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Resource Documents by Castelo Branco

Castelo Branco, Nuno; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; et al.
Low Frequency Noise-Induced Pathology: Contributions Provided by the Portuguese Wind Turbine Case
Summary: In November 2006, 4 Industrial Wind Turbines (IWT) were installed in the vicinity of a residential dwelling in Portugal. In March 2007, this team was contacted by the family requesting assistance in dealing with their Infrasound & Low Frequency Noise (ILFN) problem that they claimed was being generated by the IWT. The family began legal proceedings for the removal of the IWT, and in September 2007, this team’s first report was presented at the 2nd International Meeting on Wind . . . Complete article »

Castelo Branco, Nuno; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; et al.
Clinical Protocol for Evaluating Pathology Induced by Low Frequency Noise Exposure
Summary: Segments of the general population who complain about infrasound & low frequency noise (ILFN) in their homes or in their workplaces continue to increase. These individuals often complain about similar sets of concurrent symptoms, and frequently attribute their ailments directly to ILFN exposure. Oftentimes, however, routine clinical evaluations of these individuals reveal no apparent dysfunction, and patients with persistent complaints are subsequently referred to psychology or psychiatry health professionals. The goal herein is to present an objective clinical protocol . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Reply to: How the factoid of wind turbines causing ‘vibroacoustic disease’ came to be ‘irrefutably demonstrated’
As lead researchers in vibroacoustic disease (VAD), we have been made aware of the article by Chapman et al.[1] in which our work was greatly misrepresented and misunderstood. Correction and clarification are, therefore, required. Chapman et al. reference a 2007 paper discussing Public health and the importance of low frequency noise (LFN), in which the LFN content of a ‘Grain Terminal home’ and a ‘Wind Turbine home’ are discussed.[2] The grain terminal (GT) case, originally presented in 2004, was first-authored . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Low-Frequency Noise and Health: A Wind Turbine Case (2007–2013)
My group has been studying low-frequency noise for 30 years. Initially we began with people working in low-frequency noise [environments]. Low-frequency noise is a little bit like light. You know that there are x-rays that you do not see, but it is light. You know that there is ultraviolet that is bad for your skin and you do not see it. If you use dark glasses for x-rays or ultraviolet, it will not protect you. This is similar to noise. . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Joanaz de Melo, João; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Vibroacoustic Disease – The Response of Biological Tissue to Low-Frequency Noise
Summary BACKGROUND: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a systemic pathology caused by excessive exposure to low frequency noise (LFN). Until 1987, it was thought that the pathological effects of excessive LFN exposure were limited to the realm of cognitive and neurological disturbances. After the autopsy findings in a deceased VAD patient, it became clear that LFN impinges on the entire body, particularly the cardio-respiratory systems. In 1992, rodents were exposed to LFN, and the respiratory tract was studied through scanning and . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno; et al.
Portuguese Family and Horses Affected by Low-Frequency Wind Turbine Noise
On the Impact of Infrasound and Low Frequency Noise on Public Health – Two Cases of Residential Exposure Abstract: Noise exposure is known to cause hearing loss and a variety of disturbances, such as annoyance, hypertension and loss of sleep. It is generally accepted that these situations are caused by the acoustical events processed by the auditory system. However, there are acoustical events that are not necessarily processed by the auditory system, but that nevertheless cause harm. Infrasound and low frequency . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Vibroacoustic disease: biological effects of infrasound and low-frequency noise explained by mechanotransduction cellular signalling
Abstract At present, infrasound (0–20 Hz) and low-frequency noise (20–500 Hz) (ILFN, 0–500 Hz) are agents of disease that go unchecked. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body pathology that develops in individuals excessively exposed to ILFN. VAD has been diagnosed within several professional groups employed within the aeronautical industry, and in other heavy industries. However, given the ubiquitous nature of ILFN and the absence of legislation concerning ILFN, VAD is increasingly being diagnosed among members of the general population, including . . . Complete article »

Castelo Branco, Nuno
Low Frequency Noise: A Major Risk Factor in Military Operations
Paper presented at the NATO Research and Technology Organisation’s Applied Vehicle Technology Symposium on “Ageing Mechanisms and Control: Part A – Developments in Computational Aero- and Hydro-Acoustics”, held in Manchester, U.K., 8-11 October 2001, and published in RTO-MP-079(I). Background. Noise is a major factor in many military environments. Usually the concern is with the higher frequency bands (>500 Hz) that cause hearing damage or interfere with speech. Protection against noise is thus focused on these higher frequencies, while the bands . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Infrasound and low frequency noise dose responses
ABSTRACT  The acoustical spectrum is usually divided into two major segments: that which can be heard by the human ear, and that which cannot. Moreover, it is usually maintained that if acoustical phenomena do not hurt the ear, then they will have no other bodily effects. In the electromagnetic (E&M) spectrum, there is also a segment capable of being perceived by human senses: visible radiation (light). However, unlike the acoustical spectrum, the E&M spectrum is not crudely divided in what . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
In-Home Wind Turbine Noise Is Conducive to Vibroacoustic Disease
Abstract of paper to be presented at the Wind Turbine Noise Conference 2007, Lyon, France, September 20-21, 2007: Introduction. This team has been systematically studying the effects of infrasound and low frequency noise (ILFN, <500 Hz) in both human and animal models since 1980. Recently, yet another source of ILFN has appeared: wind turbines (WT). Like many other ILFN-generating devices, WT can greatly benefit humankind if, and only if, responsible and intelligent measures are taken for their implementation. Vibroacoustic disease . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Motylewski, Jersy; Kotlicka, Elzbieta; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Low frequency noise legislation
Paper accepted for Inter-noise 2007, 28-31 August, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Legislation regarding low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz including infrasound), when existent, is highly deficient. Not only is it expressed in dBA, actually defeating the purpose of evaluating LFN, but no concrete measures are prescribed if excessive LFN is identified. The status quo notion that acoustical phenomena are only harmful when perceived by humans cannot be sustained given current scientific facts. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate just . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Public health and noise exposure
Paper accepted for Inter-noise 2007, 28-31 August, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Noise exposure is known to cause hearing loss and a variety of disturbances, such as annoyance, hypertension and loss of sleep. It is generally accepted that these situations are caused by the acoustical events processed by the auditory system. However, there are acoustical events that are not necessarily processed by the auditory system, but that nevertheless cause harm. Infrasound and low frequency noise (ILFN, <500Hz) are acoustical phenomena that can . . . Complete article »

Castelo Branco, Nuno; and Alves-Pereira, Mariana
Vibroacoustic Disease
Noise & Health 2004; 6(23): 3-20 Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body, systemic pathology, characterized by the abnormal proliferation of extra-cellular matrices, and caused by excessive exposure to low frequency noise (LFN). VAD has been observed in LFN-exposed professionals, such as aircraft technicians, commercial and military pilots and cabin crewmembers, ship machinists, restaurant workers, and disk-jockeys. VAD has also been observed in several populations exposed to environmental LFN. This report summarizes what is known to date on VAD, LFN-induced pathology, . . . Complete article »

Alves-Pereira, Mariana; and Castelo Branco, Nuno
Industrial Wind Turbines, Infrasound and Vibro-­Acoustic Disease (VAD)
Press Release, May 31, 2007 Professor Mariana Alves-Pereira, School of Health Sciences (ERISA), Lusofona University, Portugal, and Department of Environmental Sciences & Engineering, New University of Lisbon, Portugal Nuno Castelo Branco, MD, Surgical Pathologist, President, Scientific Board, Center for Human Performance (CPH) Excessive exposure to infrasound and low frequency noise (ILFN, defined as all acoustical phenomena occurring at or below the frequency bands of 500 Hz) can cause vibro-acoustic disease (VAD). [1] Research into VAD has been ongoing since 1980, . . . Complete article »

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