- National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News - https://www.wind-watch.org/news -

Earth Day Open House planned for Lowell wind project construction site

The Lowell Mountain Occupiers invite the public for an Earth Day “Mountaintop Open House” along the crane path of the Lowell Wind Project on Sunday, April 22. Attendees may view part of the site from an adjoining property, and discuss the issues surrounding ridgeline utility-scale wind with experts and neighbors of the project. Several state legislators are also expected to participate. “There’s no better wayto commemorate Earth Day than to become a better informed citizen of your environment. That’s what the Open House is all about,” says organizer Dr. Ron Holland.

Hikers should assemble at the parking lot of the Albany Community School at 11:30 AM and carpool to the base of the mountain. The Open House will begin with a short overview of the project before groups hike (at their own pace) to the top. At the summit, there will be a site orientation, a question and answer period, and time to explore the area, eat lunch, and discuss the issues. The hike up takes 30 minutes to an hour, and the orientation and question and answer time will last approximately 30 minutes. Hikers should bring a daypack with water and a light lunch or snacks. Dress for the weather by wearing several layers: the temperature and wind chill at the top are much lower than at the bottom. The trail is muddy and steep, so hiking shoes or rubber boots are recommended. A hiking pole and a mug for hot tea or cocoa will help boost you up the hill. The event will take place rain or shine.

The Mountain Occupiers held three Mountain Top Open House events last year, which attracted hundreds of people to view the site and have their questions answered. “There are many options out there for reducing carbon emissions and fossil fuel dependence, and it’s important that people have a clear picture of the pros and cons. That’s why it’s so important that the public see firsthand what happens when a ridgeline utility-scale wind project is built,” says organizer Carrie Glessner. “Legislation continues to promote the construction of these projects, even in ecologically sensitive and highly visible locations. Projects are in the planning stages for many mountains around the state, and the people of Vermont are looking for information. We hope the Open House will help folks learn from what is happening to the Lowells, and assist them with making better decisions for Vermont’s energy future.”

For more information, contact Anne Morse at amorse@sterlingcollege.edu or 802-281-4432.