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Denmark needs more wind, solar to hit emissions target, lobby says  

Credit:  Reporting by Stine Jacobsen; editing by Jason Neely | Reuters | September 21, 2021 | www.reuters.com ~~

Denmark risks falling short of its 2030 climate targets unless it builds far more wind and solar farms and overcomes bureaucracy and local resistance to turbines, lobby group WindDenmark said on Tuesday.

Home to wind pioneers Orsted (ORSTED.CO) and Vestas (VWS.CO), Denmark is viewed as a front-runner in combating climate change and plans a 70% cut to its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 versus 1990 levels.

But in a new study WindDenmark has found the country will need three to four times more power from wind and solar than exists or is currently planned to hit that target and to become a net exporter of green energy.

It said between 70 and 110 terawatt hours (TWh) of green power is needed by 2030 versus the roughly 25 TWh built or approved for construction.

The group urged the government to set a target for how much green power would be needed by 2030.

“It takes time to set up wind farms. An action plan for green power must be in place within the next 12 months if the wind turbines are to be ready before 2030,” WindDenmark CEO Jan Hylleberg in a statement.

The energy and climate ministry said it is closely watching the matter and demand for green power, which is expected to increase.

“The government is trying to plan for this with due care but also with the necessary eye on the consequences,” the ministry said in a written comment.

Denmark is currently on track for a 54% reduction in emissions by 2030 versus 1990 levels, the independent Climate Council said earlier this year.

Source:  Reporting by Stine Jacobsen; editing by Jason Neely | Reuters | September 21, 2021 | www.reuters.com

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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