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Energy company fined after worker suffers multiple injuries in fall from height  

Credit:  Health and Safety Executive | 17th March 2021 | hse.gov.uk ~~

Energy company, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy Ltd, has been  fined after an agency worker fell 1.8 metres from a blade platform.

Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard that, on 11 November 2017, the 30-year-old was working inside one of the turbine blades at the company’s  blade factory in Hull. Inside the blade is a midway platform referred to as the “web”. He was standing on the web, vacuuming the inside of the blade to clean off fibreglass dust and deposits. As he approached the edge of the web, towards the end of the turbine blade, he fell a distance of 1.8 meters. He sustained injuries including a broken collarbone, 10 broken ribs, a broken wrist and a punctured lung and he was off work for two months.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy Ltd had provided a ladder to access to the “web” but they had not provided any fall protection either side of the ladder. The company have provided edge protection following the incident and after risk assessing the task the company have identified a method whereby there is no need to work at height, they can simply rotate the blade 90 degrees.

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy Ltd of Faraday House, Sir William Siemens Square, Frimley, Camberley, Surrey pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 (3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. The company has been fined ÂŁ533,334 and ordered to pay ÂŁ16,274 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Denise Fotheringham commented: “Falls from height often result in life-changing or fatal injuries. In most cases, these incidents are needless and could be prevented by properly planning the work to ensure that effective preventative and protective measures are in place such as edge protection or barriers built to the correct standard.

“This incident could have easily been prevented if the company had installed adequate edge protection to prevent falls”

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk[1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/ [2]
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk[3]
  4. Further information about working at height can be found: www.hse.gov.uk/work-at-height/faqs.htm
Source:  Health and Safety Executive | 17th March 2021 | hse.gov.uk

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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