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Summit County officials file conflict disclosure forms  

Robinson owns hundreds of thousands of acres of land, with roughly 10,000 acres under contract to create the first wind farm in Summit County on land near the Wyoming border. He listed his membership on various boards and commissions, including the Utah Local Government Trust, which provides insurance to the county, according to the disclosure. He also chairs the Central Wasatch Commission, to which the county has paid at least $200,000 since 2013 and which is tasked with determining transportation and land conservation solutions for the Central Wasatch Range.

Credit:  Alexander Cramer | Park Record | www.parkrecord.com ~~

High-ranking Summit County officials recently disclosed their potential conflicts of interest, a state-mandated practice that attempts to increase transparency for officials who are trusted to spend taxpayer money, award contracts and decide governmental policy.

The disclosures, which are required for appointed department heads, elected officials and their appointed chief deputies, can be found at the county’s website in the March 3 County Council agenda.

New County Councilor Malena Stevens joined Glenn Wright in declaring no conflicts, while Roger Armstrong declared that he owns his own law firm and that his wife, Beth Armstrong, is the executive director of the People’s Health Clinic, which receives grants and office space from Summit County.

Councilors Doug Clyde and Chris Robinson reported more extensive potential conflicts, with Clyde’s centered around his career as a land planner and Robinson’s around his vast land holdings.

Clyde’s clients in Summit County include Village Development Group, which is the master developer of Silver Creek Village, and a separate developer looking to build 139 units there, CW Lands Company.

Silver Creek Village is entitled for 1,300 units at the southeast corner of the Interstate 80/U.S. 40 interchange, and Clyde listed its master developer as a new client in 2020.

CW Lands Company has been a client of Clyde’s since late 2018, according to last year’s disclosures. Both are listed on this year’s disclosures as ongoing clients.

Clyde also listed as clients Bill White Enterprises and Peace House Park City, among others.

Robinson owns hundreds of thousands of acres of land, with roughly 10,000 acres under contract to create the first wind farm in Summit County on land near the Wyoming border.

He listed his membership on various boards and commissions, including the Utah Local Government Trust, which provides insurance to the county, according to the disclosure. He also chairs the Central Wasatch Commission, to which the county has paid at least $200,000 since 2013 and which is tasked with determining transportation and land conservation solutions for the Central Wasatch Range.

County Manager Tom Fisher declared he and his family run a small property management firm overseeing four properties, while Deputy County Manager Janna Young reported receiving complementary opening night tickets to the 2020 Sundance Film Festival and a “gourmet olive oil gift” for serving on the Park City Chamber/Bureau’s board of directors.

County Attorney Margaret Olson, Sheriff Justin Martinez, Health Director Rich Bullough and Community Development Director Pat Putt each reported no potential conflicts.

Source:  Alexander Cramer | Park Record | www.parkrecord.com

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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