[ exact phrase in "" • results by date ]

[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]


LOCATION/TYPE

News Home
Archive
RSS

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links

Alerts

Press Releases

FAQs

Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics

Videos

Allied Groups

North Country to play big role in Cuomo’s green energy agenda  

Credit:  By David Sommerstein (News Director) North Country Public Radio | Jan 13, 2021 | www.northcountrypublicradio.org ~~

The North Country figures to play an important – and possibly controversial – role in Governor Andrew Cuomo’s green energy agenda, which he laid out in his third State of the State speech Wednesday.

“We can establish ourselves as the nation’s leader for renewable energy innovation and production,” Cuomo said in a virtual address, “and we will secure the jobs of the future right here at home for New Yorkers.”

Cuomo announced plans for 100 new large-scale renewable projects, many of which are already underway, to help New York reduce its reliance on fossil fuels that cause climate change. The largest entail huge wind tower projects in the ocean off the shore of Long Island. But they also include another new wind project in Lewis County, and new solar installations in Washington and Franklin Counties.

Cuomo also said the state will need new high-tech transmission lines from the Canadian border near Plattsburgh and from Massena to get that power to New York City. He acknowledged that those have been controversial.

“Building transmission capacity is not as easy as it sounds, and it has historically been the single biggest stumbling block,” Cuomo said. “These obstacles may have been too much to take on yesterday. But today’s a new day, and what was impossible yesterday is a necessity.”

Cuomo also mentioned upgrading a major power line in St. Lawrence County. He said the state would also invest in workforce development to train people for green energy jobs and manufacturing.

Source:  By David Sommerstein (News Director) North Country Public Radio | Jan 13, 2021 | www.northcountrypublicradio.org

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

Wind Watch relies entirely
on User Funding
Donate $5 PayPal Donate

Share:


News Watch Home

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook

Share

CONTACT DONATE PRIVACY ABOUT SEARCH
© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.
Share

 Follow: