[ exact phrase in "" • results by date ]

[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]


LOCATION/TYPE

News Home
Archive
RSS

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links

Alerts

Press Releases

FAQs

Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics

Videos

Allied Groups

GMB calls for halt to building offshore wind farms amid jobs row  

Credit:  Call to halt building of wind farms in Scotland amid jobs row | By Hannah Carmichael, Multimedia Journalist | The National | www.thenational.scot ~~

A trade union has called for a halt to new offshore wind farms until a local supply chain is established.

GMB London echoed the growing anger from GMB Scotland after it was announced last week that contracts to supply turbine jackets for SSE’s offshore wind farm, Seagreen, in Angus, were awarded to firms in China and UAE.

The decision meant Scottish firm Burntisland Fabrications (BiFab) was left overlooked in favour of companies based thousands of miles away, even though it has engineering sites in the country, in Fife and Stornoway.

Despite BiFab securing backing from the Scottish Government to win the work, SSE Renewables claimed the gap between the submissions of foreign firms and BiFab was “too significant to close”.

Back in 2010, a Scottish Government report suggested the offshore wind sector alone could offer the potential for 28,000 direct jobs, in addition to a further 20,000 positions in related industries and a £7.1 billion investment in Scotland by this year.

But just last year, BiFab again found itself priced out for local work by global competitors after EDF granted the vast majority of the supply chain for its wind farm, about 10 miles off the coast of Fife, to Indonesia.

Now, the GMB London union is arguing that supply chain set-ups undertaken in the nuclear industry should be the go-to for renewable energy, with “tens of thousands of jobs in developing nuclear zero-carbon emissions reliable electricity” in the UK.

It says wind farms continuing to use the current supply chain will lead to higher bills for UK households, in addition to an overall lack of jobs – which it says are both against the “direct economic interest” of its members and their families.

Warren Kenny, GMB regional secretary, said: “Politicians of all stripes, who bought into the hype that renewable energy would give rise to green jobs in the UK in return for the higher electricity prices and subsidies required to bring it on stream, are taking union members for fools at the breath-taking absurdity of the supply chain and carbon emissions reality.

“The steel for the turbines and jackets is being made from high emissions coal and the ships that transport them many thousands of miles will be powered by high emissions oil.

“It is householders in the UK that are required to pay a surcharge of £10 per week on household energy bills, regardless of income, to fund the subsidies required by renewables energy suppliers to make their projects viable while creating jobs in the Far East. Without the subsidies the wind farms would not exist.”

He went on: “Offshore wind farms and the current supply chain which lead to higher bills and no jobs are against the direct economic interest of union members and families.

“The contrast with Hinkley Point and Sizewell new nuclear power supply chain could not be more stark.

“There is a verifiable UK supply chain and tens of thousands of jobs in developing nuclear zero carbon emissions reliable electricity. GMB London calls for the Government to halt awarding any further offshore wind farm electricity supply contracts until the power companies have put in place a comparable UK-based supply chain.”

Source:  Call to halt building of wind farms in Scotland amid jobs row | By Hannah Carmichael, Multimedia Journalist | The National | www.thenational.scot

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

Wind Watch relies entirely
on User Funding
Donate $5 PayPal Donate

Share:


News Watch Home

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook

Share

CONTACT DONATE PRIVACY ABOUT SEARCH
© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.
Share

 Follow: