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Delawareans should not rely on state to make wind farm decision  

Credit:  The News Journal | Feb. 13, 2020 | www.delawareonline.com ~~

Delawareans must form an independent conclusion on DNREC’s proposal to house Ørsted’s two-acre electricity substation at Fenwick Island State Park because DNREC is bound to a joint communication strategy and nondisclosure agreement with the corporate and cannot be trusted to convey unbiased information.

DNREC has neglected to provide Delawareans two key data points.

First, the proposal would meaningfully harm undisturbed and protected wetlands. Impermeable surface at the state park would increase nearly fourfold and currently undisturbed ocean-to-bay coastal wetlands would decrease by approximately 33%.

Second, the park is irrelevant to Delmarva offshore wind because existing substations are available for Ørsted to interconnect Maryland’s Skipjack project to the grid.

A study commissioned by The Maryland Energy Administration identified three existing substations in Ocean City, Maryland, as “optimal substations for the point of interconnection.” Utilizing any one of these substations, located in industrial areas around 138th St., 41st St. and 2nd St., would conserve Delaware wetlands and appropriately locate Skipjack’s substation in Maryland, the offtake state under Ørsted’s agreement.

The DNREC-Ørsted proposal at the park is simply a Fortune 500 company attempting to buy development access to Delaware’s otherwise protected wetlands. Yet, Fenwick Island State Park doesn’t need Ørsted’s money as DNREC initially proposed $2 million of reasonable improvements at the park, which would result in virtually no wetland destruction.

Given the value of Delaware’s state park wetlands, I ask stakeholders in Delaware’s future to join me in telling DNREC “Ørsted’s price is not, nor will it ever be, right.”

— Patti Breger, Hockessin

Source:  The News Journal | Feb. 13, 2020 | www.delawareonline.com

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

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