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Collector calls for wind turbine halt  

Credit:  Goulburn Post | June 17, 2013 | www.goulburnpost.com.au ~~

The Friends of Collector (FOC) are supporting calls for the federal and state governments to stop more industrial wind turbines being constructed as the nation simply could not afford the anticipated $52 billion cost of subsidies over the next 18 years.

FOC President Tony Hodgson said that Tuesday’s rally at Parliament House in Canberra was focussed on “highlighting the growing opposition to industrial wind power across the nation because of the ever increasing costs to the community for no benefit.”

“This is exactly what is being uncovered in the UK where Government figures show that wind turbine owners received almost $2 billion last year in subsidies from electricity consumers yet only employed 12,000 people across the UK – meaning a $164,000 subsidy for each job,” he said in a statement.

“What a waste of money in the UK – and what a similar waste of money here in Australia on what is ultimately a system which is a fraud paid for by the community.”

Mr Hodgson said: “We are urging the our Government to shut down the industrial wind turbine industry and keep supplying power in the short term from traditional sources so that the Australian economy can remain competitive.”

“As a nation we must develop long term policies and an energy strategy that will embrace modern technology and provide both cheap and green energy,” he said.

“We have shown through our opposition to the proposed industrial wind facility at Collector that wind power is only good for one thing – it makes the investors extremely wealthy at our expense, as consumers and taxpayers, and there are no net greenhouse gas savings.

“It is an entirely dumb idea and should be thrown on to the scrap heap of history as a failed experiment,” Mr Hodgson said.

“Just look at some of the facts about industrial wind power:

• The $52 billion in wind subsidies will ultimately be paid by electricity consumers and the tax payers over the next 18 years – the 63 turbines at the proposed wind farm at Collector alone could attract almost $1 billion in that time if the same system of RECs remains in place

• Wind is four times more expensive to consumers than traditional sources such as that produced by hydro and fossil fuel

• Wind is costing us all and will continue to increase our power bills if more are brought on-line, such as those proposed at Collector by RATCH/ Transfield

• Wind only operates at best 30% of the time, totally inefficient. Some statistics show that wind only operates between 15% and 20% of the time

• Wind needs to be backed up 100% of the time with hydro, fossil fuel or gas generated power and therefore there are no net greenhouse gas savings and the industry cannot prove otherwise

• Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) will cost the Australian taxpayers $52 billion by 2031 – a cost we simply cannot afford.

• If left unchecked, wind will continue to increase the cost of manufacturing, making Australia less competitive and will destroy long term jobs”

Source:  Goulburn Post | June 17, 2013 | www.goulburnpost.com.au

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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