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Response to Walter Anderson’s commentary  

Credit:  By Linda Miller, The Irregular, www.theirregular.com 20 April 2011 ~~

Anderson’s commentary, “Wind power is available and can be counted on,” ran in the Irregular April 13, 2011, on Page 3.)

With all due respect, because I believe you have earned that right based on your employment history with the Maine Geological Survey, Department of Conservation, as Director and State Geologist; I agree with you on almost every point you made with the exception of one.

Wind power has very little value because of its unreliable nature and because of the low amount of return Mainers get from their hard-earned dollars spent on enormously subsidized wind energy. Any good business man would tell you not to invest in a product that does not produce a good amount of return. Wind power is just such an investment. It devalues Maine’s heritage of wilderness and beauty known the world over.

Wind power will not help to rid Maine of its dependence on oil. Wind cannot begin to hold a candle to oil, gas, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, etc. as reliable energy sources. You are certainly correct when you say that we must look to other sources of energy. I strongly disagree with you about wind energy. Why? Because it is not only a poor source of energy, but it does terrific damage to our mountains at a very, very high cost to Maine in terms of capital output, tourism (which affects livelihoods), and quality of place. Those residents who live in the areas targeted for wind development know full well how it is or how it will be affecting them in their daily lives. That is why there has been such a groundswell of opposition to wind projects around the state.

Many Mainers living in areas north of Portland realize that their quality of life is being severely threatened by wind projects. There are such things as health issues, devaluation of property (that has already taken a huge hit in today’s economy), and the helplessness that comes with knowing that little can be done to protect one’s way of life. Those living in places such as your hometown of Yarmouth do not have those concerns. I know because I have family in Portland and a summer place on Long Island. I chose to retire in Lexington Township because of the beauty of the mountains and the peaceful quality of rural life which is now being threatened.

In terms of economics, if we could pay $100 for something, why would we choose to pay $300 when it is not even needed? Maine produces an abundance of electricity. The energy is sent south on the New England grid. Maine taxpayers are subsidizing wind energy big time just to jump on the “green” bandwagon that is so fashionable right now.

I do not support the destruction of massive areas of Maine to provide a minimal amount of electricity that will do nothing to get Maine off oil dependence. Maine cannot count on wind power to help sustain our economy, nor to provide for a better future for generations to come. It is an economic boondoggle that is destined to fail.

Linda Miller is a resident of Lexington Township.

Source:  By Linda Miller, The Irregular, www.theirregular.com 20 April 2011

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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