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Quincy council opposes 480-foot Milton wind turbine  

Credit:  By Jessica Bartlett, Town Correspondent, www.boston.com 23 February 2011 ~~

Quincy city councilors declared their opposition to a 480-foot-tall wind turbine to be built on the Milton/Quincy town line near the Granite Links Golf Club at Quarry Hills.

Councilor Brian Palmucci brought up the resolve at a City Council meeting Tuesday night, saying that although he supported wind energy, the placement of this turbine, and the disregard for Quincy’s thoughts on the construction, made the declaration a necessity.

“I cannot sit idly by while the town of Milton, without any consultation to the city of Quincy, essentially drops a 500-foot turbine on the border of West Quincy,” Palmucci said. “At the very least, the residents I represent deserve an opportunity to be heard on this matter, and I feel the city of Quincy does as well.”

In a message to be sent to the chair of Milton’s Board of Selectmen, Palmucci outlined how the structure would negatively affect the lucrative golf course and nearby residents with the noise, vibration, shadow effect from the blades, and flicker effect of the sun.

The structure, roughly the height of a five-story building, would be set back 100 feet from the golf course. That would bring it in conflict with Quincy’s Wind Facility Zoning ordinance, which calls for turbines to be set back a distance at least 1.5 times the height of the turbine from adjacent properties.

“It’s not that they don’t build a wind turbine, it’s that they reconsider its location,” Palmucci said.

Palmucci also worried that the tower itself would interfere with the landfill it was to be built upon, damaging the cap and gas systems, which could create an environmental hazard.

“I’d like to think we have a better relationship with the town of Milton,” Councilor Doug Gutro said. “It’s just one of those good neighbor things you do. And maybe there is a common ground. We’re asking for a reconsideration and, frankly, a dialogue with the town.”

Council President Kevin Coughlin suggested that Milton might look to solar power rather than wind energy.

“I think there are alternatives that need to be explored, and this is a respectful way of reaching out and asking them to do that,” he said.

This isn’t the first time neighboring communities have had disputes with wind turbine installation.

Hingham recently objected to a 400-foot wind turbine to be built on Turkey Hill in Cohasset, an area essentially on the town line.

Although a resolve was sent to Cohasset Board of Selectmen in mid-Dec. asking for the consideration of Hingham residents, Cohasset voted to go through with the wind turbine project.

Milton officials were unavailable for comment on the issue. The Milton Wind Energy Committee could also not be reached for comment.

Source:  By Jessica Bartlett, Town Correspondent, www.boston.com 23 February 2011

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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