[ exact phrase in "" • ~10 sec • results by date ]

[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]


News Home

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links


Press Releases


Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics


Allied Groups

Researchers hope to save bats from any harmful effects of Spring Valley Wind Farm  

Credit:  By KEITH ROGERS, Stephens Media, www.elynews.com 18 August 2010 ~~

WHITE PINE COUNTY – At night in one of the darkest places on Earth it’s hard to see, and impossible to count, the hundreds of thousands of bats that boil out of Rose Cave after sunset.

Yet biologists are using “Star Wars” technology to see and track more of the Mexican free-tailed bats – stuff such as thermal imaging scopes, infrared optics, radio tracking collars and marine-grade radar. Their research is aimed at finding ways to keep the bats from tangling with wind turbines planned in Spring Valley, about five miles away as the bat flies.

In all, 18 wind farms on public land are proposed in the Bureau of Land Management’s Ely District, including the 75-turbine Spring Valley Wind project northwest of Great Basin National Park.

“We’re concerned about cumulative impacts, and we have some concerns as to how the bats are going to interact with the wind farms,” said Jason A. Williams, a Nevada Department of Wildlife nongame biologist, during a visit to Rose Cave last week.

Source:  By KEITH ROGERS, Stephens Media, www.elynews.com 18 August 2010

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

Wind Watch relies entirely
on User Funding
Donate $5 PayPal Donate


News Watch Home

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook


© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.

Wind Watch on Facebook

Follow Wind Watch on Twitter