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Swan drive  

A study involving swans heading for wintering grounds on the Solway could influence the future development of wind farms.

Seven whooper swans are under satellite surveillance as they make their way from Iceland, down the west coast of Scotland and on to the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust at Caerlaverock.

The route the birds take which includes the Western Isles could play a role in the development of wind farms up and down the country.

WWT learning manager Brian Morrell said: “This is by no means the definitive study but we believe it could be useful to understand the migratory routes used by the birds when it comes to wind farm development. Only two of the seven can provide us with altitude readings and obviously that is important. The birds will fly higher in bright weather.

“But when the weather closes in it is different. Whoopers do fly into power lines which are not so easy to see.”

One of the birds being tracked, named Doon, has already completed his 500 mile journey.

Dumfries & Galloway Standard

9 November 2007

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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