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Wind power company concerned about eagles  

The Tasmanian wind power company, Roaring 40’s, says it has procedures in place to shut down wind turbines when wedge tailed eagles are at risk.

Two of the endangered birds have died in the past month after hitting wind turbines at Woolnorth in the state’s north west.

Ten eagles have died there since it began operating in 2003.

Birds Tasmania says the deaths are unacceptable and two of the turbines which are claiming the most lives should be closed down.

The Managing Director of Roaring 40’s, Mark Kelleher, says there are automatic shut downs in high risk conditions.

“Well we have indeed right at the moment got observers on site from dawn till dusk every day monitoring the eagle flight paths,” Mr Kelleher said.

“They certainly have the ability to shut down turbines when its assessed as a high collision risk.”

The Director of Environmental Management, Warren Jones, says the present level of eagle mortality at Woolnorth is unacceptable.

He says the company is required to have trained observers at the site until the risk of collision is reduced.

ABC News

21 September 2007

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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