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SIR – With reference to the recent planning application by ECO2 to build a wind farm in the heart of Glyncorrwg village in the upper Afan valley.

On ECO2’s website it states that one of the benefits of the turbines will be the ability to use them as an educational resource for local schools.

Presumably the lessons to be learned will be fourfold:

1. How to vivisect large numbers of rare birds.

2. How to change a once-beautiful landscape into an eyesore and essentially “scupper” the application for Glyncorrwg to be designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

3. Demonstrate how to impose noise pollution on a peaceful and unsuspecting rural environment.

4. How to take some misguided legislation (TAN8), undertake a cost-benefit analysis and ensure that company profits are protected, circumvent previously good planning principles and practices, and then impose the solution on the local populace without any consultation with the local community stakeholders.

I hope that your readers will use all their powers to resist the imposition of these monstrosities upon thriving, but small, communities so that an intelligent discussion can take place before we destroy the valleys again.

Gareth Simpson
Manor Estate, Templogue, Dublin

Who says it’s so?

SIR – Llywelyn Rhys recites the usual mantra of the British Wind Energy Association: – “Popular surveys continually show large support for wind power” (Letters, August 23).

How then does he explain 11,397 objections, with only 59 letters in support, of the huge windfarm proposed on the Isle of Lewis?

And, in the Vale of Glamorgan, the Scarweather Sand development drew 3,100 objections with, according to WAG, just nine letters of support. These are unprecedented numbers of objections to planning applications.

Who is making unsubstantiated claims?

David Bellamy

Western Mail

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

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