[ exact phrase in "" • results by date ]

[ Google-powered • results by relevance ]



LOCATION/TYPE

News Home
Archive
RSS

Subscribe to RSS feed

Add NWW headlines to your site (click here)

Sign up for daily updates

Keep Wind Watch online and independent!

Donate $10

Donate $5

Selected Documents

All Documents

Research Links

Alerts

Press Releases

FAQs

Publications & Products

Photos & Graphics

Videos

Allied Groups

Vote 'no' on Fairhaven wind issue  

On April 23, 2007, the Fairhaven Board of Selectmen passed a motion to vote on the two 400-foot industrial turbines on Little Bay in Fairhaven. My question is, why the rush? As with any project of this magnitude, let’s do our homework first.

At the meeting, Selectman Brian Bowcock stated, “This board has done its due diligence, we’ve met with the consultants, we’ve met with the developers. We’ve certainly had public hearings at least the last few years.”

Here are some facts to consider. This project has been discussed for at least three years. However, when I asked Fairhaven Executive Secretary Jeffrey Osuch on April 6, 2007 where the turbines are going, he stated that the locations have not been determined yet. After three years, shouldn’t the exact locations have been chosen by now?

I have concerns that we are told to rely on information from the “consultants” who were supposed to be looking after our interests. When these consultants were asked what profit the developer would make, they refused to divulge that information. Maybe being financed with money from the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative where the turbines would be coming from would make it hard for them to be unbiased?

Selectman Michael Silvia stated, “And the point is in fairness to the developer, I think they’re looking for an answer one way or the other, and the investor one way or the other.” The question here is, is it more important for the residents of Fairhaven to look at this project and determine if it is in the best interests of our town rather the concerns of Plymouth developer James Sweeney, who has never put up turbines before?

I could continue with other questions, such as lack of information in the feasibility study, noise, hurricanes and lowering of property values. But here is my main point: I understand with global warming and the price of oil, wind energy should be and will be looked at. However, isn’t it only fair and reasonable for the residents of Fairhaven to have all the information before voting to ensure that this particular project and location is in the best interests of our town? Putting up two 400-foot towers is an ominous project which will affect many residents in many ways.

To vote “no” on May 15 would give us time to make sure all our questions are answered. Aren’t the voters and residents of Fairhaven entitled to answers? As Fairhaven Selectman Ronald Manzone stated previously at the March 26 meeting, “People should study the facts.” Let’s take the time to do our homework first by voting “no” on May 15.

Joyce Pottel

Fairhaven

southcoasttoday.com

1 May 2007

This article is the work of the source indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this article resides with the author or publisher indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send requests to excerpt, general inquiries, and comments via e-mail.

Wind Watch relies entirely
on User Funding
Donate $5 PayPal Donate

Share:


News Watch Home

Get the Facts Follow Wind Watch on Twitter

Wind Watch on Facebook

Share

CONTACT DONATE PRIVACY ABOUT SEARCH
© National Wind Watch, Inc.
Use of copyrighted material adheres to Fair Use.
"Wind Watch" is a registered trademark.
Share

 Follow: