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Resource Documents: Birds (43 items)

RSSBirds

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  August 26, 2019
Spain, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Griffon vulture mortality at wind farms in southern Spain: Distribution of fatalities and active mitigation measures

Author:  de Lucas, Manuela; et al.

Abstract:
Wind is increasingly being used as a renewable energy source around the world. Avian mortality is one of the negative impacts of wind energy and a new technique that reduces avian collision rates is necessary. Using the most frequently-killed species, the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus), we studied its mortality at 13 wind farms in Tarifa, Cadiz, Spain, before (2006–2007) and after (2008–2009) when selective turbine stopping programs were implemented as a mitigation measure. Ten wind farms (total of 244 turbines) were selectively stopped and three wind farms (total of 52 turbines) were not. We found 221 dead griffon vultures during the entire study and the mortality rate was statistically different per turbine and year among wind farms. During 2006–2007, 135 griffon vultures were found dead and the spatial distribution of mortality was not uniformly distributed among turbines, with very few turbines showing the highest mortality rates. The 10 most dangerous turbines were distributed among six different wind farms. Most of the mortalities were concentrated in October and November matching the migratory period. During 2008–2009, we used a selective stopping program to stop turbines when vultures were observed near them and the griffon vulture mortality rate was reduced by 50% with a consequent reduction in total energy production of by the wind farms by only 0.07% per year. Our results indicate that the use of selective stopping techniques at turbines with the highest mortality rates can help to mitigate the impacts of wind farms on birds with a minimal affect on energy production.

Highlights:
► We studied griffon vulture mortality at 13 wind farms in Tarifa, before and after selective stopping program was implemented.
► 221 Dead vultures were found during the study and mortality rate was different per turbine and year among wind farms.
► During 2006–2007, 135 vultures dead and not uniformly distributed among turbines. Mortalities concentrated in October–November.
► During 2008–2009, program to stop turbines when vultures were observed near was applied. Mortality rate was reduced by 50%.
► Selective stopping turbines with the highest mortality rates can help to mitigate the impacts of wind farms on birds.

Manuela de Lucas, Miguel Ferrer, Department of Ethology and Biodiversity Conservation, Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC), Seville, Spain
Marc J.Bechard, Raptor Research Center, Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Idaho, USA
Antonio R.Muñoz, Fundación Migres, Algeciras, Spain

Biological Conservation, Volume 147, Issue 1, March 2012, Pages 184-189
doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2011.12.029

Download original document: “Griffon vulture mortality at wind farms in southern Spain: Distribution of fatalities and active mitigation measures

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Date added:  August 25, 2019
WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Visual fields, foraging and collision vulnerability in Gyps vultures

Author:  Martin, Graham; Portugal, Steven; and Murn, Campbell

Abstract:
The visual fields of vultures contain a small binocular region and large blind areas above, below and behind the head. Head positions typically adopted by foraging vultures suggest that these visual fields provide comprehensive visual coverage of the ground below, prohibit the eyes from imaging the sun and provide extensive visual coverage laterally. However, vultures will often be blind in the direction of travel. We conclude that by erecting structures such as wind turbines, which extend into open airspace, humans have provided a perceptual challenge that the vision of foraging vultures cannot overcome.

Graham R. Martin, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, U.K.
Steven J. Portugal, Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K.
Campbell P. Murn, Hawk Conservancy Trust, Sarson Lane, Weyhill, Andover, Hampshire, U.K.

Ibis: The International Journal of Avian Science
Volume 154, Issue 3, July 2012, Pages 626-631
doi: 10.1111/j.1474-919X.2012.01227.x

Download original document: “Visual fields, foraging and collision vulnerability in Gyps vultures

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Date added:  May 30, 2019
India, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

Author:  Kumar, Selvaraj Ramesh; et al.

[abstract] Wind power is renewable and helps reduce greenhouse gas emission from the energy sector; however, it also has undesirable impacts on the environment. Studies from Europe and the USA report negative impact of wind farms on wildlife, especially on birds. India, the fourth largest producer of wind energy and also a mega biodiverse country has little information on this issue. Here, we report bird collisions from two wind farms: one at Kutch, Gujarat in western India and another from Davangere, Karnataka in southern India. A total of 47 bird carcasses belonging to at least 11 species in a period of three years were reported from Kutch and seven carcasses of at least three species in a period of one year were recorded at Davengere wind farm. The estimated annual bird mortality rate for Kutch was 0.478 birds/turbine and for Davengere it was 0.466 birds/turbine.

Selvaraj Ramesh Kumar, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai 400 001, India
V. Anoop, P. R. Arun, Rajah Jayapal and A. Mohamed Samsoor Ali, Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Coimbatore, India

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 116, NO. 9, 10 MAY 2019

Download original document: “Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

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Date added:  January 8, 2019
WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Evaluating anthropogenic landscape alterations as wildlife hazards, with wind farms as an example

Author:  Law, Peter; and Fuller, Mark

[ABSTRACT]
Anthropogenic alterations to landscape are indicators of potential compromise of that landscape’s ecology. We describe how alterations can be assessed as ‘hazards’ to wildlife through a sequence of three steps: diagnosing the means by which the hazard acts on individual organisms at risk; estimating the fitness cost of the hazard to those individuals and the rate at which that cost occurs; and translating that cost rate into a demographic cost by identifying the relevant demographically-closed population. We exploit the conservation-oriented literature on wind farms to illustrate this conceptual scheme. For wind farms, the third component has received less attention than the first two, which suggests it is the most challenging of the three components. A wind farm provides an example of a ‘spatially localized hazard’, i.e., a discrete alteration of landscape hazardous to some population but of which there are some individuals that do not interact directly with the hazard themselves but nevertheless suffer a reduction in fitness in terms of their contribution to the next generation. Spatially localized hazards are identified via the third component of the scheme and are of particular conservation concern as, by their nature, their depredations on wildlife may be underestimated without an appropriate population-level estimation of the demographic cost of the hazard.

Peter R. Law, Centre for African Conservation Ecology, Department of Zoology, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
Mark Fuller, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Boise, Idaho

Ecological Indicators 94 (2018) 380–385

Download original document: “Evaluating anthropogenic landscape alterations as wildlife hazards, with wind farms as an example

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