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Save Western Ohio Q and A  

Author:  | General, Ohio

Even in countries like Germany where wind power is fully deployed across the nation, its contribution to base load power – the part coal serves – is well under 10% of the power that wind supplies, which is about 25% of its rated capacity. That math leads you to wind power’s contribution to base load power at two and a half percent of rated capacity. So it takes forty gigawatts of installed windpower – 17,000 turbines to replace one, one-gigawatt thermal plant … That’s not green in my book. Not even close. …

So what lit this fire in you to “swim against the current?”

One answer would be property values and property rights, but it is more than that. That valuable natural views would be subverted by huge, differentially moving turbine blades; that many vulnerable species of wildlife would be put at risk, as well as much sensitive habitat; that the quality of life for people who must live near them would be reduced, sometimes to the detriment of their health; that nearby property values would plummet; that few jobs and relatively little local revenues would be created–all to placate an industry that produces no meaningful product or service–is simply outrageous. …

These things throw blade fragments, can throw heavy sheets of ice, catch on fire, topple over, emit noise (both audible and subsonic) and cast incessant moving shadows. They kill birds and bats by the thousands, call for clear cutting of forested areas both for construction and to sweeten the wind, and generally scar any semblance of natural skyscape and ambiance for their rural neighbors for several miles in any direction. Enronesque property value studies there may be, but I challenge people to visit the larger wind projects in the east and come away saying you’d want to live in there. In exchange for this we get energy when it is windy enough, but not too windy, and with no regard for whether bonus energy is needed then or not. …

Download original document: “Save Western Ohio Q and A

This material is the work of the author(s) indicated. Any opinions expressed in it are not necessarily those of National Wind Watch.

The copyright of this material resides with the author(s). As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations. Send queries to query/wind-watch.org.

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