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Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  October 6, 2019
Health, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Frequency characteristics of oppressive and vibratory feeling to low-frequency sound

Author:  Morinaga, Makoto; et al.

ABSTRACT—
Although experimental results on oppressive and vibratory feelings due to low-frequency sound are widely known, those studies were conducted about 40 years ago in Japan and some questions remain to be examined. For example, “oppressive feeling” and “vibratory feeling” are generally unfamiliar terms, but it is not clear how these terms were explained to or understood by participants. In the present study, an experiment was conducted using a method similar to the previously reported method, and the frequency characteristics of sound that induced oppressive and vibratory feelings were reviewed. Using one-third octave band noise with center frequencies ranging from 10 Hz to 630 Hz, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the sound pressure level at which oppressive or vibratory feeling tended to appear for each frequency. Participants were divided into two groups. One was provided an explanation of the meaning of oppressive and vibratory feelings, and the other was provided no such explanation, and results were compared between the groups. The results suggest that sound pressure levels where these feelings tended to occur were slightly different between the two groups. Furthermore, the feelings appeared even in the higher frequency bands compared with previous studies.

Makoto MORINAGA, Ippei YAMAMOTO, Tomohiro KOBAYASHI, Defense Facilities Environment Improvement Association, Japan
Koichi MAKINO, Hiroaki OCHIAI, Kobayasi Institute of Physical Research, Japan
Hideki TACHIBANA, University of Tokyo, Japan

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 1478–1483

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Date added:  October 4, 2019
Noise, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Use of synthesised or actual wind turbine noise for subjective evaluation purposes

Author:  Cooper, Steven

ABSTRACT—
There are technical difficulties in producing an accurate wind turbine noise signal for subjective testing of the noise characteristics for different operational scenarios of wind turbines. There are differences in the subjective response when limiting the test signals to infrasound only versus the use of full spectra. The concept of “nocebo” effect that has been presented has relied upon the use of “synthesised wind turbine infrasound” that does not reflect the signature or pressure pulsations observed in full-spectrum field measurements. The validity of “synthesised wind farm infrasound signals” that have been used in such testing is examined and compared with full-spectrum signals.

Turbine noise emission components with building and human body resonances superimposed

Steven Cooper, The Acoustic Group, Australia

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 912–919

Download original document: “The use of synthesised or actual wind turbine noise for subjective evaluation purposes

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Date added:  October 4, 2019
Aesthetics, Human rights, Impacts, Iowa, Michigan, VideosPrint storyE-mail story

Iowa Farmer

Author:  Pichan, Stave

Do you hear the sound keeps my kids awake
In fields where peace used to reign?
Notice the horizon, the obstructed view
All I see are those blades
The turning and whirling, the deafening sound
Killin’ the birds, spoiling the ground around me

[chorus]
An Iowa farmer has been taken by charmers
Who came waving that green stuff
Took over my land
What did I get from the deal that was made?
When they planted those turbines
Now I live in their shade
An Iowa farmer

The shadow it flickers on the walls and the pictures
What might this do to the mind?
They call it clean, I call it pollution
The man came and sold his big lie
I saw one catch fire but nobody came
All that I had is gone down the drain over time

An Iowa farmer has been taken by charmers
Who came waving that green stuff
Took over my land
What did I get from the deal that was made?
When they planted those turbines
Now they cast a shade
On this Iowa farmer

Maybe it’s time to put up a sign
Oh they tell me there’s not much demand
For a home that’s surrounded by rotating steel
The cause of scars on the land
There’ll be no escaping the tortuous sounds
Once silence prevailed in this small rural town
But for now

I’m an just Iowa farmer who was taken by charmers
Who came waving that green stuff
To control all my land
I didn’t get much from the deal that was made
But a view of those turbines
How I hate their shade
An Iowa farmer

Steve Pichan 2019

Singer/songwriter Steve Pichan and his wife often travel through mid-Michigan where massive windfarms have sprouted over the past few years. It wasn’t long ago when the farms were in limited concentrated areas, but with each trip to the North Country, Steve noticed more and more turbines, first dotting the skyline and then suddenly polluting the once pristine horizons.

That observation got Pichan to wondering whether or not there were farmers who weren’t thrilled with the towering giants right behind barns and ominously rising above homes and fields. A little internet research was all it took for him to learn what farmers and others already knew; wind turbines aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Common problems with them involves the thousands of bats and eagles killed by the rotating blades and an effect known as “shadow flicker”, caused when rotating wind turbine blades cast shadows through constrained openings such as windows and neighboring properties. Occasionally turbines catch on fire and, due to the average height, most fire departments aren’t able to properly extinguish. Property values also take hits when windfarms are nearby. Such examples are just a few of the many complaints Pichan discovered.

So, off to the northern Michigan with guitar in the trunk, Pichan set off to put his thoughts and discoveries into song, one empathizing with the plight of a fictitious farmer in Iowa who lives under the shade of multiple turbines. The farmer knows he got a bum rap when he sold out land to energy corporations that could care less about his scarred land and access roads that once provided fertile soil for profitable crops.

“Iowa Farmer” was written, according to Pichan, to shine a light on the windfarm debacle through art and expose this concerning issue often ignored by media and those profiting from the destruction of once peaceful farms.

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Date added:  October 3, 2019
GeneralPrint storyE-mail story

Comparison of inaudible windfarm noise and the natural environment noise whilst monitoring brainwaves and heart rate

Author:  Cooper, Steven

ABSTRACT—
A pilot study undertaken in late 2017 using inaudible wind turbine noise and persons having a heightened sensitivity to turbine noise found the test subjects could detect the presence of the signal by way of feeling (rather than hearing) the signal. A control group that had not been exposed to wind turbine noise was unable to detect or sense the inaudible signal. A single case study as a precursor to a further pilot study utilised inaudible wind turbine noise, inaudible white noise, inaudible surf (ocean) noise and an inaudible ventilation fan, was undertaken in a 126 m³ reverberation room and also in a 313 hemi-anechoic room, whilst monitoring of the test subject’s heart rate and brainwaves was obtained. The results of that testing are discussed.

Steven Cooper, The Acoustic Group, Australia

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 928–934

Download original document: “A comparison of inaudible windfarm noise and the natural environment noise whilst monitoring brainwaves and heart rate

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