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Resource Documents: Asia (1 items)

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Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  September 21, 2019
Health, Japan, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Epidemiological study on long-term health effects of low-frequency noise produced by wind power stations in Japan

Author:  Ishitake, Tatsuya; Norimatsu, Yoshitaka; and Hara, Kunio

ABSTRACT—
We investigated whether long-term exposure to wind turbine noise (WTN) including low-frequency noise generated by wind power facilities is a risk factor of sleep disorders. We performed an epidemiological study of living environment and health effects, surveying 9,000 residents (≥20 years) living in areas with operational wind power facilities. Sleep disorders were assessed using the Athens Insomnia Scale. To assess environmental noise in residential areas near the wind turbines, low-frequency sound exposure levels were measured at 50 community centers of the town. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for evaluation of a risk factor for several noise exposure indices. Significant relationships between the distance from the nearest WT to dwellings and hearing, annoyance, sleep disorders were observed. By multiple logistic analysis the prevalence rate of sleep disorders was significantly higher for residents who reported subjectively hearing noise being than for those who did not. Moreover, the reported prevalence rate of sleep disorders was significantly higher in residents living at a distance of ≤1,500 m from the nearest wind turbine compared to that for residents living at a distance ≥2,000 m. The attitudes of residents towards wind power facilities and sensitivity to noise strongly affected their responses regarding sleep disorder prevalence.

Tatsuya ISHITAKE, Yoshitaka MORIMATSU, Kurume University, School of Medicine, Japan
Kunio HARA, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Health Science, Japan

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 1455–1462

Download original document: “Epidemiological study on long-term health effects of low-frequency noise produced by wind power stations in Japan

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Date added:  May 30, 2019
India, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

Author:  Kumar, Selvaraj Ramesh; et al.

[abstract] Wind power is renewable and helps reduce greenhouse gas emission from the energy sector; however, it also has undesirable impacts on the environment. Studies from Europe and the USA report negative impact of wind farms on wildlife, especially on birds. India, the fourth largest producer of wind energy and also a mega biodiverse country has little information on this issue. Here, we report bird collisions from two wind farms: one at Kutch, Gujarat in western India and another from Davangere, Karnataka in southern India. A total of 47 bird carcasses belonging to at least 11 species in a period of three years were reported from Kutch and seven carcasses of at least three species in a period of one year were recorded at Davengere wind farm. The estimated annual bird mortality rate for Kutch was 0.478 birds/turbine and for Davengere it was 0.466 birds/turbine.

Selvaraj Ramesh Kumar, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai 400 001, India
V. Anoop, P. R. Arun, Rajah Jayapal and A. Mohamed Samsoor Ali, Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Coimbatore, India

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 116, NO. 9, 10 MAY 2019

Download original document: “Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

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Date added:  January 3, 2019
China, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Observation and comparison of tower vibration and underwater noise from offshore operational wind turbines in the East China Sea Bridge of Shanghai

Author:  Yang, Chun-Mei; Liu, Zong-Wei; Lü, Lian-Gang; et al.

[Abstract] Underwater operational turbine noise emitted by China’s first offshore wind farm in the East China Sea Bridge of Shanghai was measured and analyzed in this study. Two sensors were used in the measurement: a hydrophone recording the underwater sound and an accelerometer placed in the turbine tower detecting the tower vibrations. Measurements were performed at two different types of wind turbines: a Sinovel 3 MW SL3000 turbine and a Shanghai Electric 3.6 MW W3600 turbine. The two turbines show similar tower vibration characteristics, characterized by a number of tonal components, mainly in the low-frequency domain (30-500 Hz). The peak vibration frequencies changed with the wind speed until the turbine approached its nominal power rating. Spectral analysis of the underwater acoustic data showed that the amplitude spectra had a strong correlation with the spectra of the turbine vibration intensity level, indicating that the measured underwater noise was generated by the tower mechanical vibration.

Chun-Mei Yang, Zong-Wei Liu, Lian-Gang Lü, Guang-Bing Yang, Long-Fei Huang, and Ying Jiang
Key Laboratory of Marine Science and Numerical Modeling, First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao, China

Journal of the Acoustic Society of America 2018 Dec;144(6):EL522. doi: 10.1121/1.5082983.

Download original document: “Observation and comparison of tower vibration and underwater noise from offshore operational wind turbines in the East China Sea Bridge of Shanghai

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Date added:  November 6, 2018
India, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Wind farms have cascading impacts on ecosystems across trophic levels

Author:  Thaker, Maria; Zambre, Amod; Bhosale, Harshal; et al.

[abstract] Wind farms are a cleaner alternative to fossil fuels for mitigating the effects of climate change, but they also have complex ecological consequences. In the biodiversity hotspot of the Western Ghats in India, we find that wind farms reduce the abundance and activity of predatory birds (for example, Buteo, Butastur and Elanus species), which consequently increases the density of lizards, Sarada superba. The cascading effects of wind turbines on lizards include changes in behaviour, physiology and morphology that reflect a combination of predator release and density-dependent competition. By adding an effective trophic level to the top of food webs, we find that wind farms have emerging impacts that are greatly underestimated. There is thus a strong need for an ecosystem-wide view when aligning green-energy goals with environment protection.

Numerical effect of wind turbines on predatory birds and lizard prey. a,b, Lateritic habitat on the Chalkewadi plateau (a) with (n = 3 sites) and (b) without wind turbines (n = 3 sites). c, The endemic superb fan-throated lizard S. superba, which lives on the Chalkewadi plateau. d–f, Areas with wind turbines (red box plots) had (d) a significantly lower abundance of predatory birds (birds per 3 h), (e) a significantly lower frequency of raptor attacks on ground-dwelling prey (attacks per 3 h) and (f) significantly higher densities of lizards (lizards per 100 m belt transect) compared with areas with no wind turbines (blue box plots). Box plots show the medians, quartiles, 5th and 95th percentiles, and outliers.

Maria Thaker, Amod Zambre, and Harshal Bhosale
Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru

Nature Ecology & Evolution. Published online November 5, 2018. doi: 10.1038/s41559-018-0707-z

Download original document: “Wind farms have cascading impacts on ecosystems across trophic levels

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