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Resource Documents: Technology (132 items)

RSSTechnology

Also see NWW "technology" and "size" FAQs

Documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are provided to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate.


Date added:  March 10, 2018
Grid, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Effect of Energy Storage on Variations in Wind Power

Author:  Paatero, Jukka; and Lund, Peter

[abstract] Irregularities in power output are characteristic of intermittent energy, sources such as wind energy, affecting both the power quality and planning of the energy system. In this work the effects of energy storage to reduce wind power fluctuations are investigated. Integration of the energy storage with wind power is modelled using a filter approach in which a time constant corresponds to the energy storage capacity.The analyses show that already a relatively small energy storage capacity of 3 kWh (storage) per MW wind would reduce the short-term power fluctuations of an individual wind turbine by 10%. Smoothing out the power fluctuation of the wind turbine on a yearly level would necessitate large storage, e.g. a 10% reduction requires 2–3 MWh per MW wind.

Jukka V. Paatero and Peter D. Lund
Helsinki University of Technology, Advanced Energy Systems, Espoo, Finland

Wind Energy 2005; 8:421–441. DOI: 10.1002/we.151

Download original document: “Effect of Energy Storage on Variations in Wind Power

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Date added:  December 5, 2017
Noise, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

Author:  Barlas, Emre; et al.

Abstract —
The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.

Emre Barlas, Wen Zhong Shen, and Kaya O. Dag
— Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
Wei Jun Zhu – School of Hydraulic, Energy and Power Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China
Patrick Moriarty – National Wind Technology Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado, USA

The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 2017 Nov;142(5):3297.
doi: 10.1121/1.5012747.

Download original document: “Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

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Date added:  October 31, 2017
Economics, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Wind Energy Operations & Maintenance

Author:  Wind Energy Update

2010 report:

2012 report:

2017 report:

As part of our research into failure rates, costs and downtime on US Wind Farms, we have built a model which estimates lifetime costs of scheduled maintenance for a wind farm in the US. The input data used to build this data pack is a 210MW wind farm made up of 105 2MW turbines of 80 metres in height. The tables below show component risk factors, periodic maintenance costs, failure scenarios and supply chain factors [all costs USD]. CMS [complete monitoring system] options play an increasingly important role in both mean time to repair and the time between failures. As a result they have a large impact on costs. These are also taken into account. Finally the data pack provides major component lifetime O&M cost for the wind farm.

Scheduled maintenance cost—
Frequency per year: 2
Cost per action per turbine: $6,000
Reduced cost: $5,100
Lifetime cost per farm: $21,420,000

Component risk factors—

Components Replacement cost Failure rate (%), failures per 100 parts by year 20 Total failures in 20 years (total farm) Average downtime per failure, days Average downtime losses per faiure Total downtime losses for the rest of the Labor cost per failure Crane cost per failure
Gearbox $220,000 8 8.4 5.2 $5,241.6 $44,029 $20,000 $150,000
Blades $120,000 8 25.2 1.8 $1,814.4 $45,723 $25,000 $45,000
Generator $130,000 10 10.5 4.2 $4,233.6 $44,453 $7,000 $61,000

Supply chain risk factors—

  Spare in stock / No spare Distance to manufacturing facility (if no spare available)
Available / No spare Lead time, days Close / Medium / Remote Time for transportation, days
Gearbox No spare 70 Remote 15
Blades No spare 105 Remote 15
Generator No spare 70 Remote 15

CMS factors (per turbine)—

  Capital Sensor Cost (including installation) per turbine Annual cost (O&M) per turbine Detectability Efficiency
Monitoring type Cost Reduced cost (economies of scale) Fixed cost Reduced cost (economies of scale)
Gearbox Oil+vibration+temperature $20,000 $18,000 $1,000 $850 58 59
Vibration+temperature $10,000 $9,000 41 49
Temperature 0 0 24 42
Blades Optical $15,500 $13,950 35 40
Generator Temperature 0 0 40

 

  Preventive Predictive

Lifetime maintenance cost for the farm Lifetime maintenance cost assuming secondary damage Lifetime maintenance and CMS operation cost for the farm Monitoring type
Gearbox $3,420,829 $3,762,912 $3,910,603 Oil+vibration+temperature
$3,444,192 Vibration+temperature
$2,915,926 Temperature
Blades $5,241,963 $5,504,061 $5,930,817 Optical
Generator $2,224,253 $2,379,950 $1,909,027 Temperature

We have also looked at failure rates across different turbine technology types and designs. The graph below shows major component failure rates for all types of turbines in our dataset during the first ten years of operations. Different failure modes have different repair times, ultimately leading to different costs.

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Date added:  July 23, 2017
Economics, Europe, Germany, Grid, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Windenergie in Deutschland und Europa

Author:  Linnemann, Thomas; and Vallana, Guido

Windenergie in Deutschland und Europa

[Wind energy in Germany and Europe: Status quo, potentials, and challenges in the baseload supply of electricity – Part 1: Developments in Germany since 2010]

English Abstract:

In Germany, the installed nominal capacity of all wind turbines has increased eightfold over the past 16 years to 50,000 megawatts today. In the 18 most important European countries using wind energy today, the nominal capacity rose twelvefold to more than 150,000 megawatts.

One essential physical property of wind energy is its large spatiotemporal variation due to wind speed fluctuations. From a meteorologic point of view, the electrical power output of wind turbines is determined by weather conditions with typical correlation lengths of several hundred kilometres. As a result, the total wind fleet output of 18 European countries extending over several thousand kilometres in both north-south and east-west directions is highly volatile and exhibits a strong intermittent character. An intuitively expected significant smoothing of this wind fleet output to an degree that would allow a reduction of backup power plant capacity, however, does not occur. In contrast, a highly intermittent wind fleet power output showing significant peaks and minima is observed not only for a single country, but also for the whole of the 18 European countries. Wind energy therefore requires a practically 100% backup. As the (also combined) capacities of all known storage technologies are (and increasingly will be) insignificant in comparison to the required demand, backup must be provided by conventional power plants, whose economics are fundamentally impaired in the absence of capacity markets.

Windenergie in Deutschland und Europa: Status quo, Potenziale und Herausforderungen in der Grundversorgung mit Elektrizität – Teil 1: Entwicklungen in Deutschland seit dem Jahr 2010

Thomas Linnemann und Guido S. Vallana
VGB PowerTech, Essen, Deutschland

VGB PowerTech 6 | 2017

Download original document: “Windenergie in Deutschland und Europa

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