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Resource Documents: Wildlife (270 items)

RSSWildlife

Also see NWW "wildlife" FAQ

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  August 25, 2019
WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Visual fields, foraging and collision vulnerability in Gyps vultures

Author:  Martin, Graham; Portugal, Steven; and Murn, Campbell

Abstract:
The visual fields of vultures contain a small binocular region and large blind areas above, below and behind the head. Head positions typically adopted by foraging vultures suggest that these visual fields provide comprehensive visual coverage of the ground below, prohibit the eyes from imaging the sun and provide extensive visual coverage laterally. However, vultures will often be blind in the direction of travel. We conclude that by erecting structures such as wind turbines, which extend into open airspace, humans have provided a perceptual challenge that the vision of foraging vultures cannot overcome.

Graham R. Martin, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, U.K.
Steven J. Portugal, Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K.
Campbell P. Murn, Hawk Conservancy Trust, Sarson Lane, Weyhill, Andover, Hampshire, U.K.

Ibis: The International Journal of Avian Science
Volume 154, Issue 3, July 2012, Pages 626-631
doi: 10.1111/j.1474-919X.2012.01227.x

Download original document: “Visual fields, foraging and collision vulnerability in Gyps vultures

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Date added:  July 8, 2019
Environment, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Impact of wind energy on wildife and the environment

Author:  Henderson, Peter; Krüger, Oliver; Richarz, Klaus; and Byrne, Paula

This publication focuses on a topic that has previously been a taboo for policymakers, but also for nature conservation organisations in Germany. The environmentally destructive effects of renewable energies has never been widely discussed – mainly because they are seen as reducing carbon dioxide emissions. … The German Wildlife Foundation is not generally against wind energy. We are not opposed to any technology. But we are opposed to the unbridled expansion of energy projects in natural environments and natural spaces, a process that is increasingly happening today, especially in Germany. … The papers in this publication show what threats nature and wildlife now face from this expansion.

Fritz Vahrenholt, German Wildlife Foundation

The Global Warming Policy Foundation, an educational think tank based in London, does not have a position on wind energy or renewable energy. We neither oppose nor promote it. However, we are in favour of weighing up the pros and cons. Any form of energy production, whether conventional or renewable, has its costs and benefits, and many environmental problems come with every form of energy generation.

One of the big problems that confronts us today is that we live in an age where some of these issues are taboo; where particular topics cannot be openly discussed. Throughout history, whenever societies were faced with a lack of openness or censorship, grave mistakes have been inevitable. After all, you can only learn from mistakes if you are allowed to talk about problems openly. It is in this context that it is eminently important that the pros and cons of all forms of energy generation are openly addressed. Only by weighing up the pros and cons can politicians and the wider public get a better idea of what is reasonable and what is unreasonable.

We are not opponents of wind energy. Where wind energy makes sense it should be used. Wherever it is unreasonable and destructive, it should be avoided. The problem, of course, is that we often don’t fully understand the positive and negative impacts. I hope that this booklet will allow readers to have a better understanding of both German and international developments, so that the interested public can get a better picture of these particular problems of conservation.

Benny Peiser, Global Warming Policy Foundation

This paper, produced by the Global Warming Policy Foundation and the German Wildlife Foundation, takes a Europe-wide look at the conflict between wind energy and nature conservation. In many European countries, people are opposing wind energy projects that are destroying wildlife habitats. … In particular, the consequences of wind turbines in forests are serious for many types of wildlife. We observe with great concern the massive expansion of wind power in Germany’s forest areas. … An open and constructive debate on the consequences that wind energy can have on wildlife – from insects to black storks to wildcats – is more than overdue.

The German Wildlife Foundation regards wind energy as an important contributor to the energy mix of the future. Its further expansion in Germany, Europe and also worldwide, however, should not be promoted at any price. For Germany, at least for the construction of wind turbines in the forest, we demand a moratorium. This would allow us to reconsider the future course of action and, on the basis of scientific findings and national and European nature conservation laws, to adopt a far-sighted course in line with the precautionary principle that is enshrined in environmental policy.

Hilmar Freiherr von Münchhausen, German Wildlife Foundation

Contents:
Ecological impacts of wind turbines – Peter Henderson, Pisces Conservation and University of Oxford
Wind power and birds of prey: problems and possible solutions – Oliver Krüger, University of Bielefeld
Wind energy in forests and species conservation: vision and reality – Klaus Richarz, Bundesverband Wissenschaftlicher Vogelschutz
Wind energy in Ireland – Paula Byrne, Wind Aware Ireland

© Copyright 2019 The Global Warming Policy Foundation

Download original document: “The impact of wind energy on wildife and the environment

See also: 
Green killing machines: The impact of renewable energy on wildlife and nature”, by Andrew Montford
Truly Green? How Germany’s ‘Energy Transition’ is destroying nature”, by Michael Miersch, director of the German Wildlife Foundation (Deutsche Wildtier Stiftung)
Grüne Energie? Wie ökologisch sind Windkraft und Biogas?

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Date added:  May 30, 2019
India, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

Author:  Kumar, Selvaraj Ramesh; et al.

[abstract] Wind power is renewable and helps reduce greenhouse gas emission from the energy sector; however, it also has undesirable impacts on the environment. Studies from Europe and the USA report negative impact of wind farms on wildlife, especially on birds. India, the fourth largest producer of wind energy and also a mega biodiverse country has little information on this issue. Here, we report bird collisions from two wind farms: one at Kutch, Gujarat in western India and another from Davangere, Karnataka in southern India. A total of 47 bird carcasses belonging to at least 11 species in a period of three years were reported from Kutch and seven carcasses of at least three species in a period of one year were recorded at Davengere wind farm. The estimated annual bird mortality rate for Kutch was 0.478 birds/turbine and for Davengere it was 0.466 birds/turbine.

Selvaraj Ramesh Kumar, Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai 400 001, India
V. Anoop, P. R. Arun, Rajah Jayapal and A. Mohamed Samsoor Ali, Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Coimbatore, India

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 116, NO. 9, 10 MAY 2019

Download original document: “Avian mortalities from two wind farms at Kutch, Gujarat and Davangere, Karnataka, India

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Date added:  March 9, 2019
California, Oregon, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Comments on proposed amended habitat mitigation plan

Author:  Smallwood, Shawn

On behalf of Friends of the Columbia Gorge, Oregon Wild, the Oregon Natural Desert Association, Central Oregon LandWatch, the Audubon Society of Portland, and East Cascades Audubon Society, I write to comment on the Request for Amendment 4 for the Summit Ridge Wind Farm, which requests a postponement of construction start and end dates for the project and which proposes an amended Habitat Mitigation Plan (January 2019). I primarily wish to comment on (1) the suitability of the habitat assessment underlying the amended Habitat Mitigation Plan, and (2) the need to update baseline surveys, project impact predictions, mitigation measures, and post-construction monitoring protocols. Updated surveys and analyses are needed in part because over the near-decade that has passed since the primary baseline study (Northwest Wildlife Consultants 2010), science has made vast improvements in field survey methods and in our understanding of wind turbine collision factors, displacement effects, and cumulative impacts related to wind projects. Methodology has vastly improved in preconstruction studies needed to predict project-scale and wind turbine-scale impacts, to measure post-construction impacts, and to assess whether and to what degree specific mitigation measures can be tested for efficacy. …

ATTACHMENT 1
Skilled Dog Detections of Bat and Small Bird Carcasses in Wind Turbine Fatality Monitoring. K. Shawn Smallwood, Doug Bell, Skye Standish. 16 February 2018

ATTACHMENT 2
Comparison of Wind Turbine Collision Hazard Model Performance Prepared for Repowering Projects in the Altamont Pass Wind Resources Area. K. Shawn Smallwood and Lee Neher. 7 January 2017 (Updated 5 April 2018)

ATTACHMENT 3
Addendum to Comparison of Wind Turbine Collision Hazard Model Performance: One-year Post-construction Assessment of Golden Eagle Fatalities at Golden Hills. K. Shawn Smallwood. 10 April 2018

Download original document: “Smallwood – Re: Summit Ridge Wind Farm – Request for Amendment 4

See also:  Comments by Friends of the Columbia Gorge, Oregon Wild, Oregon Natural Desert Association, Central Oregon LandWatch, Audubon Society of Portland, and East Cascades Audubon Society

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