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Resource Documents: Impacts (129 items)

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Also see NWW "costs/benefits" FAQ

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial educational effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  August 5, 2023
Environment, MeteorologyPrint storyE-mail story

Wind farm and solar park effects on plant–soil carbon cycling: uncertain impacts of changes in ground-level microclimate

Author:  Armstrong, Alona; Waldron, Susan; Whitaker, Jeanette; and Ostle, Nicholas

Abstract – Global energy demand is increasing as greenhouse gas driven climate change progresses, making renewable energy sources critical to future sustainable power provision. Land-based wind and solar electricity generation technologies are rapidly expanding, yet our understanding of their operational effects on biological carbon cycling in hosting ecosystems is limited. Wind turbines and photovoltaic panels can significantly change local ground-level climate by a magnitude that could affect the fundamental plant–soil processes that govern carbon dynamics. We believe that understanding the possible . . .

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Date added:  August 3, 2023
Belarus, Romania, Russia, Ukraine, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Wildlife and infrastructure: impact of wind turbines on bats in the Black Sea coast region

Author:  Măntoiu, Dragoş Ştefan; et al.

Abstract – In Eastern Europe, wind energy production is currently promoted as an important source of renewable energy, yet in most cases without appropriate consideration of the negative impacts wind turbines (WT) may have on protected species such as bats. Here, we present first data on fatality rates, fatality factors and the likely origin of bats killed by WT in the Dobrogea region (Romania), located in a major migratory corridor for wildlife in Eastern Europe. Over a 4-year period, we found . . .

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Date added:  August 2, 2023
Texas, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

An analysis of displacement from wind turbines in a wintering grassland bird community

Author:  Stevens, T.K.; Hale, A.M.; Karsten, K.B.; and Bennett, V.J.

Abstract – Wind energy development is rapidly increasing within breeding and wintering ranges of many grassland birds in North America. Despite recognized environmental benefits of such development, wind farms have the potential to negatively impact bird communities. Using an area-search method, we surveyed grassland birds within a matrix of pastures, hay fields, and agricultural lands at a wind facility in north-central Texas during the winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11. We used binary logistic regression to examine the effect of distance from . . .

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Date added:  August 1, 2023
Europe, WildlifePrint storyE-mail story

Bat Mortality at Wind Turbines in Northwestern Europe

Author:  Rydell, Jens; et al.

Abstract – We reviewed published and unpublished written reports on bat mortality at wind farms in northwestern Europe. The estimated number of bats killed per turbine annually was relatively low (0–3) on flat, open farmland away from the coast, higher (2–5) in more complex agricultural landscapes, and highest (5–20) at the coast and on forested hills and ridges. The species killed almost exclusively (98%) belonged to a group (Nyctalus, Pipistrellus, Vespertilio and Eptesicus spp.) adapted for open-air foraging. The bats were . . .

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