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Resource Documents: Health (479 items)

RSSHealth

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  September 23, 2019
Health, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Pilot study on perceived sleep acceptability of low-frequency, amplitude modulated tonal noise

Author:  Hansen, Kristy; Nguyen, Phuc; Zajamsek, Branko; Micic, et al.

Abstract—
The global expansion of wind farm facilities has been associated with community complaints regarding sleep disturbance. This may be related to the presence of amplitude modulation (AM) in wind turbine noise (WTN), which has been shown to result in increased annoyance. However, at present, it is unknown whether acceptability for sleep is judged differently to annoyance or if AM may be more problematic for sleep than other noise types. Previous studies have also focused predominantly on ‘swish’ noise rather than tonal AM, where the latter has been more consistently measured at several wind farms in South Australia at distances greater than 1 km. Therefore, this study investigated the perceived sleep acceptability of WTN containing low-frequency tonal AM through listening tests involving 13 participants. A total of 13 noise stimuli were synthesised based on real recordings of WTN. The tonal audibility and AM depth were varied within a range relevant to the AM depth measured in field recordings. Participant responses were highly variable, but in self-reported noise-sensitive individuals, an increase in the AM depth at a tonal audibility of 12 dB(A) was associated with lower acceptability for sleep.

Kristy HANSEN, Phuc NGUYEN, Branko ZAJAMSEK, Gorica MICIC, Peter CATCHESIDE
Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health (AISH), Flinders University, Australia

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 1447–1454

Download original document: “Pilot study on perceived sleep acceptability of low-frequency, amplitude modulated tonal noise

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Date added:  September 21, 2019
Health, Japan, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Epidemiological study on long-term health effects of low-frequency noise produced by wind power stations in Japan

Author:  Ishitake, Tatsuya; Norimatsu, Yoshitaka; and Hara, Kunio

ABSTRACT—
We investigated whether long-term exposure to wind turbine noise (WTN) including low-frequency noise generated by wind power facilities is a risk factor of sleep disorders. We performed an epidemiological study of living environment and health effects, surveying 9,000 residents (≥20 years) living in areas with operational wind power facilities. Sleep disorders were assessed using the Athens Insomnia Scale. To assess environmental noise in residential areas near the wind turbines, low-frequency sound exposure levels were measured at 50 community centers of the town. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for evaluation of a risk factor for several noise exposure indices. Significant relationships between the distance from the nearest WT to dwellings and hearing, annoyance, sleep disorders were observed. By multiple logistic analysis the prevalence rate of sleep disorders was significantly higher for residents who reported subjectively hearing noise being than for those who did not. Moreover, the reported prevalence rate of sleep disorders was significantly higher in residents living at a distance of ≤1,500 m from the nearest wind turbine compared to that for residents living at a distance ≥2,000 m. The attitudes of residents towards wind power facilities and sensitivity to noise strongly affected their responses regarding sleep disorder prevalence.

Tatsuya ISHITAKE, Yoshitaka MORIMATSU, Kurume University, School of Medicine, Japan
Kunio HARA, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Health Science, Japan

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 1455–1462

Download original document: “Epidemiological study on long-term health effects of low-frequency noise produced by wind power stations in Japan

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Date added:  September 20, 2019
Health, Noise, TechnologyPrint storyE-mail story

Influence evaluation of infrasound by using both of biological information and infrasound sensors in the vicinity of wind turbine facilities

Author:  Nagamatus, Megumi; and Yamamoto, Masa-yuki

ABSTRACT—
In recent years, wind power generation attracts attention. However, problem of low frequency sound generated by wind turbines and its influence on human beings have been gradually taken up in society. We investigated the influence of ultra-low frequency sound generated from wind turbines on human subjects/testers from both aspects of measurement of audible/infrasonic sound and multiple biometric information sensing systems. In the experiment outside, portable electroencephalographs and pulse wave sensors are used because only such small equipment can be used to perform biological information sensing outdoor, in the vicinity of a wind turbine facility. In order to calculate relax trends from the obtained biological information, a method based on previous analyses for obtaining relaxation degrees R is used. It is coming from the fact that content rate of each frequency band included in the electroencephalogram waveform varies depending on the human mental state in the brain wave. Also, in analyzing the heart beat wave, we used an analytical method to find stress degrees S by using the balance of autonomic nerve that can be calculated from the heart beat signal fluctuations. Here we would like to introduce the result using the above analyses methods for almost 30 examples.

Megumi NAGAMATSU, Masa-yuki YAMAMOTO
Kochi University of Technology, Japan

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 2992–2999

Download original document: “Influence evaluation of infrasound by using both of biological information and infrasound sensors in the vicinity of wind turbine facilities

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Date added:  August 29, 2019
Denmark, HealthPrint storyE-mail story

Long-term wind turbine noise exposure and the risk of incident atrial fibrillation in the Danish Nurse cohort

Author:  Bräuner, Elvira; et al.

Highlights

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The potential health effects related to wind turbine noise (WTN) have received increased focus during the past decades, but evidence is sparse. We examined the association between long-term exposure to wind turbine noise and incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF).

METHODS: First ever hospital admission of AF amongst 28,731 female nurses in the Danish Nurse Cohort were identified in the Danish National Patient register until ultimo 2013. WTN levels at residential addresses between 1982 and 2013 were estimated using the Nord2000 noise propagation model, as the annual means of Lden, Lday, Levening and Lnight at the most exposed façade. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the association between the 11-, 5- and 1-year rolling means of WTN levels and AF incidence.

RESULTS: 1430 nurses developed AF by end of follow-up in 2013. Mean (standard deviation) baseline residential noise levels amongst exposed nurses were 26.3 (6.7) dB and slightly higher in those who developed AF (27.3 (7.31) dB), than those who didn’t (26.2 (6.6)). We observed a 30% statistically significant increased risk (95% CI: 1.05-1.61) of AF amongst nurses exposed to long-term (11-year running mean) WTN levels ≥20 dB(A) at night compared to nurses exposed to levels <20 dB(A). Similar effects were observed with day (HR 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.54), and evening (HR 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.54) noise levels. CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to WTN and AF amongst female nurses. However, interpretation should be cautious as exposure levels were low.

Elvira V. Bräuner, Jeanette T. Jørgensen, Anne Katrine Duun-Henriksen, Zorana J. Andersen
Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Claus Backalarz, Jens E. Laursen, Torben H. Pedersen
DELTA Acoustics, Hørsholm, Denmark
Mette K. Simonsen
Diakonissestiftelsen; and The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg, Frederiksberg, Denmark

Environ Int. 2019 Sep;130:104915. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.104915. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

Download original document: “Long-term wind turbine noise exposure and the risk of incident atrial fibrillation in the Danish Nurse cohort

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