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Resource Documents: Health (480 items)

RSSHealth

Unless indicated otherwise, documents presented here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch. These resource documents are shared here to assist anyone wishing to research the issue of industrial wind power and the impacts of its development. The information should be evaluated by each reader to come to their own conclusions about the many areas of debate. • The copyrights reside with the sources indicated. As part of its noncommercial effort to present the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of large-scale wind power development to a global audience seeking such information, National Wind Watch endeavors to observe “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of U.S. Copyright Law and similar “fair dealing” provisions of the copyright laws of other nations.


Date added:  January 19, 2020
Health, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Santé des hommes et des animaux face aux infrasons produits par les éoliennes

Author:  Various

Actes du Colloque du 16 Novembre 2018—

SOMMAIRE
Introduction
John Yelland, physicien et ingénieur
Jean-Paul Borsotti, neurologue
Marie-Stella Duchiron, Docteur en sciences forestières, ingénieur du génie rural, des eaux et des forêts
Bruno Frachet, oto-rhino-laryngologiste
Gilbert Mouthon, vétérinaire,
Yves Couasnet, Docteur en sciences et techniques du bâtiment (ENCP), ingénieur acousticien
Mariana Alves-Pereira, ingénieur biomédical et docteur en sciences de l’environnement
Henri Delolme, médecin épidémiologiste

ANNEXES
Les effets du bruit au travail sur la santé
Le principe de dose-effet en acoustique
Les échelles de bruit
La sonie, unite subjective de psycho-acoustique
Contenu temporel et spectral du bruit d’une centrale eolienne
Les infrasons au coeur d’une vieille controverse
Seuils de sensibilite aux infrasons
Etude en double aveugle et effet nocebo
Etude infrasons à Cape Bridgewater
Propagation des infrasons : Deux regles

Download original document: “La santé des hommes et des animaux face aux infrasons produits par les éoliennes

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Date added:  November 4, 2019
Health, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

Case studies that have convinced me that industrial wind turbines make people sick

Author:  Acker, William

William G. Acker
Acker & Associates
Prepared: December 27, 2015 through Feb. 18, 2019

Download original document: “Some of the case studies that have convinced me that industrial wind turbines make people sick, which supports my belief that we can prove in a court of law that these wind turbines are causing annoyance and illnesses

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Date added:  October 7, 2019
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Investigation of the unpleasantness of infrasound combined with audio sound using psychoacoustic scaling methods

Author:  Burke, Elisa; et al.

ABSTRACT—
At many immission sites, human exposure to infrasound (f < 20 Hz) is usually accompanied by sound in the audio-frequency range (audio sound, 20 Hz ≤ f < 20 kHz). This gives rise to the question of whether the interaction between infrasound and audio sound affects the quality of auditory perception. Psychoacoustic experiments were performed within the framework of the EARS 2 project of the European Metrology Programme for Innovation and Research (EMPIR). Recent results in this project had already shown that detection thresholds for infrasound were increased when simultaneous audio sound is present. The current study deals with the hypothesis that the unpleasantness related to infrasound is changed when infrasound is presented along with audio sound. A rating task on a numerical scale and a pairwise comparison task were conducted to quantify and to compare the unpleasantness of (1) isolated infrasound (sinusoid), (2) isolated audio sound (sinusoid and broadband), and (3) the combination of both, at different sound pressure levels. Normal hearing listeners aged from 18 to 30 years participated in the hearing tests. The results should be of use to improve the understanding of the impact of combined noise on humans and their well-being in the vicinity of potential noise sources.

Elisa Burke, Euginia Putri Stederi, Stefan Uppenkamp, Christian Koch
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; Medizinische Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 3000–3006

Download original document: “Investigation of the unpleasantness of infrasound combined with audio sound using psychoacoustic scaling methods

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Date added:  October 6, 2019
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Frequency characteristics of oppressive and vibratory feeling to low-frequency sound

Author:  Morinaga, Makoto; et al.

ABSTRACT—
Although experimental results on oppressive and vibratory feelings due to low-frequency sound are widely known, those studies were conducted about 40 years ago in Japan and some questions remain to be examined. For example, “oppressive feeling” and “vibratory feeling” are generally unfamiliar terms, but it is not clear how these terms were explained to or understood by participants. In the present study, an experiment was conducted using a method similar to the previously reported method, and the frequency characteristics of sound that induced oppressive and vibratory feelings were reviewed. Using one-third octave band noise with center frequencies ranging from 10 Hz to 630 Hz, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the sound pressure level at which oppressive or vibratory feeling tended to appear for each frequency. Participants were divided into two groups. One was provided an explanation of the meaning of oppressive and vibratory feelings, and the other was provided no such explanation, and results were compared between the groups. The results suggest that sound pressure levels where these feelings tended to occur were slightly different between the two groups. Furthermore, the feelings appeared even in the higher frequency bands compared with previous studies.

Makoto MORINAGA, Ippei YAMAMOTO, Tomohiro KOBAYASHI, Defense Facilities Environment Improvement Association, Japan
Koichi MAKINO, Hiroaki OCHIAI, Kobayasi Institute of Physical Research, Japan
Hideki TACHIBANA, University of Tokyo, Japan

Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9–13 September 2019, Aachen, Germany: pages 1478–1483

Download original document: “Frequency characteristics of oppressive and vibratory feeling to low-frequency sound

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