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Resource Documents by Barclay, Robert

Baerwald, Erin; Patterson, Bill; and Barclay, Robert
Origins and migratory patterns of bats killed by wind turbines in southern Alberta: evidence from stable isotopes ~
Abstract. Large numbers of migratory bats are killed every autumn at wind energy facilities in North America. While this may be troubling from a population perspective, these fatalities provide an opportunity to learn more about bat migration and the origins and summer distributions of migratory bats by using endogenous markers. Such markers include stable isotope values, which have been used to answer questions about ecological systems, such as trophic levels and food webs, and the origins and migratory routes of . . .

Frick, Winifred; Baerwald, Erin; Pollock, Jacob; Barclay, Robert; Szymanski, Jennifer; et al.
Fatalities at wind turbines may threaten population viability of a migratory bat ~
Abstract: Large numbers of migratory bats are killed every year at wind energy facilities. However, population-level impacts are unknown as we lack basic demographic information about these species. We investigated whether fatalities at wind turbines could impact population viability of migratory bats, focusing on the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), the species most frequently killed by turbines in North America. Using expert elicitation and population projection models, we show that mortality from wind turbines may drastically reduce population size and increase . . .

Cryan, Paul; and Barclay, Robert
Causes of bat fatalities at wind turbines: hypotheses and predictions ~
Thousands of industrial-scale wind turbines are being built across the world each year to meet the growing demand for sustainable energy. Bats of certain species are dying at wind turbines in unprecedented numbers. Species of bats consistently affected by turbines tend to be those that rely on trees as roosts and most migrate long distances. Although considerable progress has been made in recent years toward better understanding the problem, the causes of bat fatalities at turbines remain unclear. In this . . .

Cryan, Paul; Jameson, Joel; Baerwald, Erin; Willis, Craig; Barclay, Robert; Apple Snider, E.; and Crichton, Elizabeth
Evidence of Late-Summer Mating Readiness and Early Sexual Maturation in Migratory Tree-Roosting Bats Found Dead at Wind Turbines ~
Abstract Understanding animal mating systems is an important component of their conservation, yet the precise mating times for many species of bats are unknown. The aim of this study was to better understand the details and timing of reproductive events in species of bats that die most frequently at wind turbines in North America, because such information can help inform conservation strategies. We examined the reproductive anatomy of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), eastern red bats (L. borealis), and silver-haired bats . . .

Baerwald, Erin; d’Amours, Genevieve; Klug, Brandon; and Barclay, Robert
Barotrauma is a significant cause of bat fatalities at wind turbines ~
Summary. Bird fatalities at some wind energy facilities around the world have been documented for decades, but the issue of bat fatalities at such facilities – primarily involving migratory species during autumn migration – has been raised relatively recently. Given that echolocating bats detect moving objects better than stationary ones, their relatively high fatality rate is perplexing, and numerous explanations have been proposed. The decompression hypothesis proposes that bats are killed by barotrauma caused by rapid air-pressure reduction near moving turbine blades. . . .

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