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    These postings are provided to help publicize the efforts of affiliated groups and individuals related to industrial wind energy development. Most of the notices posted here are not the product of nor are they necessarily endorsed by National Wind Watch.


    posted:  April 22, 2014
    Meetings, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  INCE Europe

    Low Frequency Noise 2014

    The next conference in the Low Frequency Noise series will be in Berlin, Germany.

    Dates: 29 September 2014 – 1 October 2014

    Submission Deadlines

    Suggested Topics

    Who Should Attend?

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    posted:  April 21, 2014
    Action alerts, Environment, Information, IrelandPrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  David Simpson, Inishowen Wind Energy Awareness Group

    Wild Atlantic Way under threat from developers

    First challenge to Wild Atlantic Way – barely one month after its establishment – could set precedent for wind farm/other development on route of the Wild Atlantic Way.

    OUTLINE – THE FACTS

    A wind farm of two turbines has permission, following an appeal to An Bord Pleanala, to be built on the route of the Wild Atlantic Way. The developer has recently put in an amendment (1450014) to increase the height by 24% to 132 metres.

    Donegal County Council refused permission for the height increase. Their grounds for refusal highlighted two areas: Wild Atlantic Way: Scenic Driving Routes and Donegal County Council’s Tourism Policy. The public road passing Crockbrack Hill is now identified as a Scenic Driving Section of the Wild Atlantic Way. Scenic Driving Sections are selected ‘to provide the visitor with opportunities to see and experience the best land and seascapes along the route spine’ (My italics).

    Council policy supports the need for protection. Tourism Policy (TOU-P-3) states: “not to permit development proposals which would detract from the visual quality/amenity on either the approach roads to, or views to be had from significant tourist attractions” (My italics).

    The developers have now put in a new Appeal to An Bord Pleanala (PL O5E.243207; to view the Appeal go to Donegal County Council Planning on line: 1450368) asking them to overturn the Council’s refusal.

    In their appeal they take a very narrow, restricted view of the Wild Atlantic Way. The developer states: “The Discovery Point at Kinnagoe Bay represents the coastal views as can be seen from the public car park that serves the beach”. They argue that as the site of the farm is inland and cannot be seen from the car park then it can be developed further. The permitted wind farm is already going to be visible from the route of the Wild Atlantic Way, even before this appeal for an increase in the height. The WAW is about the route not the destination. It ignores the lived experience of the moment when you first see the sea and travel down the Long Glen road to reach it. Crockbrack Hill sits right in the middle of this view and the developer argues that two turbines at 132 metres (twice the height of Letterkenny Cathedral) won’t adversely impact on the visual amenity. A local resident said: “It is called the Wild Atlantic Way, not the Wild Atlantic Point. It is called Way because the experience of travelling on it is about the journey and not about individual, separated points”.

    The developer makes the following claim in his appeal: “In the first instance it is not considered that the purpose of the Wild Atlantic Way is to sterilise all lands from future development along the western coastline of Ireland from Donegal to Cork and all places in between” (p 20 of Appeal document).

    At the moment the only areas protected from wind farms are those with European designations (SAE and Bird – based on endangered species – why do we have to wait till something is endangered until it is protected?). Local Councils can only use the criteria of Visual Amenity to reject a development. This leaves the rest of the country wide open for wind farm development. This is surely the wrong way round. Instead of saying lets leave everything open apart from designated areas. We should be saying where is sensitive and needs to be protected, and then with prudence open the rest for consideration. Donegal Council is carrying out a Landscape Character Assessment in order to identify sensitive areas that do not have European designations.

    “What is wrong with the idea of protecting an internationally recognised, €10 million euro tourist route from inappropriate, intrusive development? What is wrong with protecting our greatest assets from inappropriate development?” said another local resident.

    Threat to Tourism

    The proliferation of wind farms has the potential to make Ireland ‘sterile’ – slowly tourists will seek wilder, unspoilt, undeveloped landscapes elsewhere. A new Scottish survey (of 1,000 people) by the Mountaineering Council of Scotland has found that two thirds of people think turbines are making Scotland a less appealing place to visit. Four out of five called for ‘buffer zones’ around areas of outstanding beauty. Seventy three percent said they would choose accommodation without a wind farm view compared to five percent who said they wanted to see a turbine. The MCS says the findings are a ‘stark warning’. (Telegraph, 18th March 2014.)

    Observations on the Appeal

    It is possible to make an Observation to An Bord Pleanala about the Appeal. If you think that the Wild Atlantic Way should be protected from inappropriate, intrusive development, please write in an objection to the Appeal.

    Letters need to state that you are asking An Bord Pleanala to reject the Appeal (PLO5E.243207) on the following grounds:

    Send your letters, with a €50 cheque, to An Bord Pleanala, 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1.

    BACKGROUUND AND COMMENTARY

    The paint is barely dry on the signs for the new Wild Atlantic Way (WAW) and the tourists have yet to arrive and a wind farm developer is already

    What is wrong with protecting our assets? Ireland already has a disgraceful history of giving away our assets. Before the tourists have arrived international finance wants to strip our assets while we pay green taxes to subsidize them while they do it. They will leave the country once the subsidies stop.


    It’s called the Wild Atlantic Way not the Wild Industrialised Way

    It’s called the Wild Atlantic Way, not the Wave our Assets Away

    The WAW is not the end of development. Why not see the WAW as an opportunity to work with local communities rather than exploit local land? Why not use their expertise as developers to work with local communities to develop new tourist businesses on the route itself (cafes, tourist centres, exhibitions, tours)? Unfortunately they want to exploit the land for their own profit not for local people. The Celtic Tiger is not dead it has moved to new territory – our land and wind farms.

    Background

    The developer put in an appeal to An Bord Pleanala on 31st March 2014 to secure an increase in the height of the turbines to 132 metres, a 24% increase, on the route of the WAW. This is just over four weeks since the launch of the WAW on 27th February 2014. The history of this development is as follows:

    The public road passing Crockbrack Hill is now identified as a Scenic Driving Section of the Wild Atlantic Way. Scenic Driving Sections are selected “to provide the visitor with opportunities to see and experience the best land and seascapes along the route spine” (My italics). Council policy supports the need for protection. Tourism Policy (TOU-P-3) states: “not to permit development proposals which would detract from the visual quality/amenity on either the approach roads to, or views to be had from significant tourist attractions” (My italics).

    The developer is now appealing to An Bord Pleanala to uphold their application to increase height of turbines by 24% (PL O5E.243207).

    Issues in the Irish Planning System

    The Irish planning system is a system that makes it hard for ordinary local people to object or challenge decisions. Twenty euros to submit to a Council planning application. Fifty euros to submit to an An Bord Pleanala appeal. Thousands of euro to challenge an An Bord Pleanala decision through a Judicial Review.

    Donegal County Council responded to local residents’ outcry that the developer had put notice of original application in the Irish Times (Jan 9th 2012). They passed a resolution that made it mandatory to put Notices in Local Papers. Central government told them they did not have the right to make this change to planning regulations and so they had to withdraw it

    This developer has used this to put 6 notices in national papers (only once in a local which was about a small, insignificant aspect of the development).

    The same planning regulations for notifying the public apply for a twenty six turbine wind farm as for a two-bedroom bungalow: namely a Notice (item in national/local paper) and a sign on a gate.

    The planning system allows a developer wins an appeal at An Bord Pleanala for a specified application, he can then submit as many amendments as he likes that change any and all aspects of the original application.

    An Bord Pleanala has meetings in an office in Dublin to decide local cases. In the UK, the Planning Inspector who visits the site of an appeal and meets with all relevant parties on the ground makes the final decision.

    The planning system can only ‘strongly recommend’ that developers consult with local communities. Practise is way behind that of other European countries: “proud to be European but not too keen to act like one”.

    The planning system deals in restricted, defined areas using minute, limited criteria to make decisions. A good example of this is the approach of the appeal to how to make a decision on the impact of a wind farm on the route of the Wild Atlantic Way. The developer states:
    “The Discovery Point at Kinnagoe Bay represents the coastal views as can be seen from the public car park that serves the beach”. They argue that as the site is inland and cannot be seen from the car park then it can be developed further. He completely ignores the lived experience of the moment when you first see the sea and travel down the Long Glen road to reach Kinnagoe Bay. Crockbrack Hill sits right in the middle of this view and the developer argues that two turbines at 132 metres (twice the height of Letterkenny Cathedral wont adversely impact on the visual amenity.

    “It is called the Wild Atlantic Way, not the Wild Atlantic Point”. It is called Way because the experience of travelling on it is about the journey and not about individual, separated points.

    Developer’s Appeal raises issue of Sterilisation

    The developer makes the following claim in his appeal: “In the first instance it is not considered that the purpose of the Wild Atlantic Way is to sterilise all lands from future development along the western coastline of Ireland from Donegal to Cork and all places in between” (p 20 of Appeal document).

    Leaving aside the obvious scare-mongering tactic that this kind of comment is, lets look at sterilisation.

    This might actually be a good idea. At the moment the only areas protected from wind farms are those with European designations (SAE and Bird – based on endangered species – why do we have to wait till something is endangered until it is protected?). Local Councils can only use the criteria of Visual Amenity to reject a development. This leaves the rest of the country wide open for wind farm development. This is surely the wrong way round. Instead of saying lets leave everything open apart from designated areas. We should be asking where is sensitive and needs protection. Then with prudence open the rest for consideration. Donegal Council has started a Landscape Character Assessment as a way to identify sensitive areas.

    What is wrong with the idea of protecting an internationally recognised, multi million euro tourist route from inappropriate, intrusive development?

    What is wrong with protecting our assets? Before the tourists have arrived international finance wants to strip our assets while we pay green taxes to subsidize them while they do it. They will take their money else where once the subsidies stop.

    Sterilisation has two meanings:

    What is sterile are the ways that planning makes decisions and the rooms that they do it in.

    They have been made sterile from the spirit of the land.

    They have been made sterile from the lived experiences of local people.

    Developers are sterilised from consulting with and working with and giving benefit to the very local communities that they intend to develop with wind farms

    Some radical protestors might argue that it is development itself which should be sterilised. Imagine if it had been sterilised from building too many ghost estates and too many empty holiday homes. (Why can the government not work out how many houses are needed and then allow developers to only build that many? Why can they not work out how many wind turbines are needed for Ireland and then disallow any further proliferation of unneeded wind farms?)

    What needs sterilising is the government’s desire to inseminate thousands of wind farms across Ireland for the benefit of the few.

    The proliferation of wind farms has the potential to make Ireland sterile – slowly tourists will seek wilder, unspoilt, undeveloped landscapes elsewhere. A new Scottish survey by the Mountaineering Council of Scotland has found that two thirds of people think turbines are making Scotland a less appealing place to visit. Four out of five called for ‘buffer zones’ around areas of outstanding beauty. Seventy three percent said they would choose accommodation without a wind farm view compared to five percent who said they wanted to see a turbine. The MCS says the findings are a ‘stark warning’. (Telegraph, 18th March 2014.)

    Conclusion

    The land cannot speak for itself. We are guardians of it.

    If you think that the Wild Atlantic Way should be protected from inappropriate, intrusive development, if you care about the land of Ireland and the spirit of the land and want to see it protected from wind farm development, please write in an objection to the Appeal.

    Letters need to state that you are asking An Bord Pleanala to reject the Appeal (PLO5E.243207) on the following grounds:

    Send your letters, with a €50 cheque, to An Bord Pleanala, 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1.

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    posted:  April 9, 2014
    Announcements, Meetings, NoisePrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  INCE/Europe

    Wind Turbine Noise 2015

    Venue: Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland
    Date: Monday 20th April to Thursday 23rd April 2015

    This is the sixth of the biennial international conferences on Wind Turbine Noise. Many of us thought, when Geoff Leventhall opened his first conference in Berlin in 2005, that by 2015 all the noise issues with wind turbines would have been solved and the conferences would no longer be necessary. The opposite is true and last year’s conference, held unusually outside Europe, attracted nearly 200 delegates from 22 countries representing manufacturers, developers, researchers, environmentalists, pressure groups, consultants and exhibitors.

    The sixth conference will once again provide an opportunity for all those with an interest in wind turbine noise, its generation, its prediction, its assessment and its effects on people, to meet together and discuss common problems and solutions.

    At this conference, for the first time, we will be having poster as well as oral presentations – ideal where more explanation or discussion of a topic is needed. The venue has a large open break-out space and this will be open before and, in particular, after oral presentations each day giving time for networking over refreshments, discussions round the posters and informal workshops on “hot topics”. The oral presentations are expected to be 20 minutes.

    Offers of papers for this conference are invited and prospective authors should submit a 200 to 300-word abstract by 15 November 2014. There is a template for this on the website where you can sign-up to receive further information as time progresses. The conference website can be found at: http://windturbinenoise.eu

    PROVISIONAL LIST OF TOPICS:

    Source noise mechanisms and propagation
    · Noise generation mechanisms and reduction at source
    · Amplitude Modulation – mechanism and solutions
    · Propagation models and their accuracy

    Health issues related to turbines
    · Sleep disturbance and annoyance
    · Non-acoustic factors in attitudes to wind turbine noise
    · Infrasound and Amplitude Modulation effects

    Measurement and testing experience
    · Specific instrumentation for WTN measurements
    · IEC 61400-11 ed.3
    · Baseline background noise
    · Post completion compliance testing

    And:
    · Offshore wind farm construction
    · Small wind turbines – specific problems
    · Standards and regulations

    Further information from:
    Cathy Mackenzie
    Conference Secretary, INCE/Europe
    4 Oakland Vale, New Brighton, Merseyside CH45 1LQ, UK
    Tel: +44 (0)151 638 0281
    email: cathy/cmmsoffice.demon.co.uk

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    posted:  April 5, 2014
    Announcements, Campaigns, Ireland, Meetings, Press releasesPrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  Wind Aware Ireland

    Wind Aware Ireland launch campaign and website

    Wind Aware Ireland will launch their new campaign and website on April 10th, 2014 from 10am at Buswells’ Hotel, Molesworth St., Dublin 2. We aim to hold policy makers to account to ensure that they act on evidence. We will provide a counter balance to business influence on the political process.

    Wind Aware Ireland are bringing together a group of experts and formidable presenters to urge reform of the Irish government’s unsustainable wind energy policies. Our objective is to ensure that energy policies and developments fulfill the three pillars of sustainability; environmental, economic and social.

    Who Are We?

    Wind Aware Ireland is a non-profit, non-political alliance of community groups and individuals who challenge the Irish government’s current unsustainable wind energy policy. Wind Aware Ireland represents community groups and individuals concerned about current wind energy plans as well as the associated grid and substation infrastructure upgrades necessary to support wind energy.

    The Launch:

    The event is taking place on April 10th in Buswells’ Hotel (Dublin City) at 10am.

    Confirmed speakers include:

    Fr. Sean Healy is an economist and the Director of Social Justice Ireland who provide analysis and policy to improve society and the lives of people in Ireland through focusing on human rights. He contributes to media debate on social justice and the widening gap between rich and poor in Ireland.

    Don Moore is Chairman of the Energy Standing Committee of the Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE) who have advised on achieving Ireland’s energy and CO2 reduction targets. The IAE have recognised the need for alternative policies to achieve these targets while maintaining competitiveness and reasonable electricity prices.

    Jim Power is Chief Economist at Friends First Group, one of Europe’s largest insurance groups. He previously worked as Chief Economist at Bank of Ireland Group and Treasury Economist at AIB Group. He is a frequent contributor to radio and TV.

    Senator John Whelan is a Labour party senator representing Laois/Offaly. He has consistently opposed his party on the issue of wind energy. He is a journalist of 30 years and has worked as editor of several local newspapers. He has been a long time commentator on current affairs from the midlands for the national media.

    Marian Harkin MEP is an Independent MEP. She is in her second European term and previously represented Sligo/Leitrim as a TD in Dail Eireann. Her work on the Petitions Committee, involves connecting ordinary citizens to the EU Institutions to try to resolve issues where there is non compliance with EU legislation.

    In order to ensure that you receive the most appropriate and targeted information from Wind Aware Ireland, can you please confirm that you (or a colleague) will be attending so that we have the appropriate individual available to you, adequate space, internet access and facilities for you.

    As further speakers are yet to be confirmed, a final schedule will follow.

    Contact:
    Paula Byrne, PRO
    Wind Aware Ireland
    www.windawareireland.com
    Email: paula@windawareireland.com
    Phone: 057 86 27048
    Mobile: 086 8241523

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    posted:  April 2, 2014
    Action alerts, Economics, Impacts, U.S.Print storyE-mail story

    Source:  Glenn Schleede

    Note to Senators to reject PTC extension

    Ladies & Gentlemen:

    I’m now sending the following note to various senators. If any of you find it useful, feel free to use it in whole or part with or without attribution.

    When contacting senators’ offices, please don’t forget their in-state offices. You can find telephone and fax numbers on members’ web sites.

    Glenn Schleede
    April 2, 2014


    How much will Senator Grassley’s plan to extend the Wind Production Tax Credit (PTC) add to the national debt we are passing along to our children and grandchildren?

    On Thursday, April 3, 2014, the U.S. Senate Finance Committee is expected to consider and report out to the full Senate a bill that would extend various federal tax breaks.

    Senator Grassley (R-IA) has announced that he will amend this tax break “extender” bill to continue for two more years the wind “Production Tax Credit” (PTC) that benefits corporations that own “wind farms.” Owners of “wind farms” would be able to reduce their income tax liability by $0.023 (adjusted upward for inflation) for each kilowatt-hour of electricity produced by their wind turbines during the next 10 years.

    The wind PTC was initially passed in 1992 as a temporary incentive to help a then fledgling industry – with the expectation that wind energy would be environmentally benign and become economically competitive. However, after 20 years of lucrative wind energy tax breaks and subsidies valued at over $100 billion:

    Grassley’s proposed 2-year extension of the wind PTC would add more than $20 billion to the huge national debt that Congress is loading on to our children and grandchildren. That $20 billion would be in addition to the hundred plus billions that have already been lavished on the wind industry since the wind PTC was instigated by Senator Grassley in 1992!

    Further, since the Government must pay interest on the national debt and Congress has shown no intention of paying off the national debt the burden of tax breaks such as the wind PTC will grow and grow – more than doubling the debt over the next two decades even if interest charges average only 4% per year and there was no more annual federal budget deficits.

    Clearly, it is time for all members of Congress, including Senator Grassley, to resist pressure from the wind industry and stand up for today’s tax payers – and even more so for our children and grandchildren who will bear – unfairly – the debt that is being passed on to them.

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    posted:  March 15, 2014
    Aesthetics, Economics, Energy, Netherlands, PublicationsPrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  VVD Wijk bij Duurstede

    Weg met windmolens — “Down with wind turbines” game

    The beautiful panorama of Wijk bij Duurstede might be changing. With an abundance of arguments you can prevent this! Will you play “Down with wind turbines”?

    No. I am from SP/GroenLinks/D66.
    Yes. I accept the challenge.

    1. How far away can a 150-meter wind turbine be seen standing in the landscape?
    2. How many euros less would a Wijks house be worth near wind turbines by the canal?
    3. How many cars is the energy generated by a spinning wind turbine equivalent to?

    [Shoot down the five wind turbines.]

    “Ik wil een herkansing”: I want a rematch.

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    posted:  March 5, 2014
    Environment, France, ProtestsPrint storyE-mail story

    Source:  Collectif Sauvons l’Aveyron

    Manifestation anti éolienne à Rodez

    Le collectif « sauvons l’Aveyron » organise une grande manifestation d’opposition à l’éolien industriel à Rodez le Vendredi 7 mars 2014 devant la préfecture de 14 h. à 16 h.

    Ce collectif regroupe 27 associations. Le rassemblement aura lieu place Foch à partir de 13 h.

    En Aveyron,

    - 94 éoliennes sont déjà installées.

    - 122 ont reçu l’accord du permis de construire, essentiellement sur le Lévézou et le Sud Aveyron mais font l’objet d’un recours au tribunal administratif grâce au travail des 27 associations de protection de l’environnement soucieuses de protéger les paysages aveyronnais et leur biodiversité qui sont un patrimoine commun.

    - 240 supplémentaires sont en projet d’implantation un peu partout en Aveyron.

    - Soit 456 éoliennes gigantesques en tout, implantées sur 60 communes, qui entraineront la construction d’un méga-transformateur à St Victor et Melvieu capable d’accueillir 800 éoliennes.

    Nous vous invitons à participer à cet évènement et vous en remercions d’avance.

    Contact presse:
    Jean Marty
    Collectif Sauvons l’Aveyron
    jean-albert/hotmail.fr
    tél. 06 79 32 06 32

    eol/eolien.info
    06 80 99 38 08

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